Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 37, October 18

A Screen with Fewer Holes
Byline: Eric Smillie Cervical cancer ought to be an easily conquered disease. Slow to develop, it gives doctors a window of up to 10 years to detect and treat its occurrence. That's one reason its incidence and mortality rate have plunged more than...
Bad Samaritans
Byline: Christopher Zara Pity Alexian Lien, who had a pretty rough couple of days. He was chased by a motorcycle gang, beaten by a mob and hospitalized, and now he doesn't even know if he can trust his Good Samaritan. Lien was in the papers a...
Beware of Geeks Bearing GIFs
Byline: Sean Elder It's Saturday night at The Sea ("Home of the $57 halibut!"), which is perched on the border between Palo Alto and Mountain View, and anyone new here might think there's a big gay scene in Silicon Valley. Guys outnumber women about...
Bienvenido a la Nanny State
Byline: Karla Zabludovsky Has Mexico become the latest child in New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's ever-expanding nanny state? Bloomberg's push for a soda tax south of the border is the most controversial in a series of programs he is funding...
Big Data's Full-Court Press
Byline: Kevin Maney The NBA is about to unleash Big Data about big men -- a data onslaught that will change the way we experience spectator sports as profoundly as the invention of television. We'll soon know whether LeBron James runs faster...
Death of a President
Byline: Jeff Stein President Barack Obama might be forgiven if he has moments when he fantasizes about killing Hamid Karzai. Someday, notes from the Oval Office (or maybe even secret tapes) may reveal that Obama and his aides tossed around ideas...
Ginger Baker Hates You
Byline: Gogo Lidz Ginger Baker was everything we know he can be during his return to New York last week after eight years of self-exile: same old surliness, same old irascibility, same old belligerence that fell same old flat. Baker is the cantankerous...
How the Shutdown Hammered the U.S. Economy
Byline: Leah McGrath Goodman How much has the government shutdown and the default threat cost us? Before the latest congressional melee over government spending, the U.S. federal deficit was shrinking and seemed poised to shrivel even more in...
Iran and Syria Eye Israel's Nukes
Byline: Benny Avni As Iran diplomacy is renewed in earnest, and as Syria promises to surrender its poison weapons, a perennial clarion call is revived across the Middle East: Want no more Syrian chems or Iranian nukes? Want to end all Middle East...
Israel's Desert Ghetto
Byline: Vanessa O'Brien As much as it may pain him to say so, Atiyeh Al A'sam knows his ancestors' ways have vanished. It has been many years since tent-dwelling Bedouin tribes roamed the Negev Desert. They had nothing like the electricity, running...
Just Add Water
Byline: Roxanne Palmer A tiny pellet barely the diameter of a human hair is the only thing that stands in the way of extracting endless cheap energy from tap water. After years of frustration, scientists now think they are close to a breakthrough...
Love Hurts
Byline: Alexander Nazaryan There are sinkholes on Floyd Maines's property, and there may be cancer in his lungs. The former are plain to see; the latter is suggested by the low thunder of his cough, though what he surmises may be a "spot" of mesothelioma...
Rainbow Demolition
Byline: Susan Scutti Speaking to a local newspaper, an official of the Kuwaiti Health Ministry said his government was developing a form of preventative "gaydar" - a "medical" test to detect gays and lesbians in order to prevent them from entering...
Second Time around B.C
Byline: Philip Ross Did Barney Rubble recycle his waste? Did Fred Flintstone go to the bottle bank? Archaeologists have discovered that recycling, our guilty green response to wasteful late 20th century consumerism, was first practiced more than...
Shutdown Winners and Losers
Byline: Pema Levy Even a race to the bottom has winners and losers. So it is with the U.S. government shutdown. Poll after poll bears bad news for the Grand Old Party: A majority of Americans blame them for the shutdown, saying they put politics...
The Drugs Don't Work
Byline: Kurt Eichenwald The first sign of her daughter's potentially fatal illness appeared on Mother's Day. Initially, Tonya Rerecic wasn't concerned. Addie, her 11-year-old, seemed tired - not a surprise for a kid who participated in plenty...
The Great Unwashed
Byline: Katya Cengel Doniece Sandoval parks her BMW alongside a line of shopping carts outside a homeless shelter in San Francisco's Mission District. Maneuvering around the carts full of empty bottles and belongings, Sandoval makes her way inside...
'The Joy Is Coming'
Byline: Patricia Rey Mallen "Every Chilean life is shaped by the dictatorship," says Carmen Garfias. "Whether you lived through it, or you ran away from it, or you have only heard about it - it is a part of all of us." The secret police were...
Where Have You Gone, Concrete Charlie?
Byline: John Walters Once upon a time in the National Football League, quarterback was the stuff of boyhood dreams and middle linebacker the stuff of nightmares. More than just football's most iconic position on defense, middle linebacker was a...