Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 36, October 11

'Calculated to Alarm'
Byline: Michael Brick The weapon he was carrying, an AK-74 assault rifle, measures three feet long, with a barrel of about 16 inches, and is capable of firing several dozen rounds per minute. Brian McCauley says he never meant to scare anyone. The...
Chemical Peel
Byline: Benny Avni Destroying Syria's huge caches of Sarin, mustard gas, VX and other chemical agents won't be easy - or cheap. And President Bashar Hafez al-Assad won't be footing the bill. How much will it cost? Estimates range from several...
Crossing Swords with Pirates in Cyberspace
Byline: Ryan Neal The Glen Park public library in San Francisco is usually a quiet, calm place. No more so than the science-fiction section, where nerds congregate to read their emails on the free Wi-Fi. On Tuesday that tranquility was rudely interrupted...
Daughters of the Syrian Revolution
Byline: Janine di Giovanni Al Marj Settlement, Lebanon - Four million children are caught up in the war in Syria. Thirteen-year-old Rabia is one of them. Tall and gangly, teetering on the verge of womanhood, she sits shivering in a yellow T-shirt...
Eight Things You Don't Know about Ted Cruz
Byline: Pema Levy The standard, stirring bootstrap story Ted Cruz tells about himself goes something like this: His father arrived in America from Cuba with nothing but $100 sewn into his underwear; he went to Princeton and then Harvard Law School;...
Mad Scientist
Byline: Chris Weller Two months after Ocorrafoo Cobange, a biologist at the Wassee Institute of Medicine in Asmara, submitted a paper to the Journal of Natural Pharmaceuticals, he received an email congratulating him on the paper's acceptance. But...
Messi, Ronaldo and El Clasico
Byline: John Walters LeBron James has appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated six times in the past two years; no other person has had more than three times in that span. King James is currently the most popular athlete in American sport and...
Nice Invisibility Cloak!
Byline: Jeff Stein Frank Archibald is a nice guy in a killer job - literally. Last May the affable, hulking former Clemson University football player, 57, was named head of the CIA's National Clandestine Service, which is home to the agency's spies...
Open and Shut Case
Byline: Steve LaTourette It's hard to understand how one person or a small group of people can convince others to do something that will end badly for them. It is still hard to fathom how the cult leader Jim Jones could have persuaded so many intelligent...
Tech's Next Big Shot in the Arm
Byline: Kevin Maney This is the big secret about Obamacare: It is pushing the health care industry to spend unprecedented money building out shiny new technology that is going to do amazing stuff - like telling you you've got a goiter before you...
The Golden Tablets
Byline: Thomas Halleck Isn't it nice when two giants fight for your affection like overeager suitors? That's what's going on now in the tablet wars. Amazon unveiled the newest iteration of its Kindle tablet last week, and the specs are way up and...
UnSound Advice
Byline: Josh Lieberman A special scientific research team has finally published its answer to a grisly mystery. Five years ago, something drove a group of approximately 100 melon-headed whales, ordinarily a deep-ocean species, into the shallows...
Wall Street Loves a Cheater
Byline: Lynnley Browning On the 35th floor of the five-star Mandarin Oriental Hotel in New York, amid the shadows of Gucci-clad women sipping stupidly expensive cocktails in pale-gold armchairs, Noel Biderman, the founder of Ashley Madison, the...
Whooping Cough: A Comeback Story Nobody Loves
Byline: Elijah Wolfson Epidemiologists did their best to warn everyone, but too many people had their own ideas. Now it's happening: The highly contagious and potentially fatal disease pertussis, also known as whooping cough - practically eradicated...
You Know the Drill
Byline: Leah McGrath Goodman Flying northwest of Aspen in a small aircraft - a single-engine Cessna Centurion 210 - I discreetly vomit into a bag of candy I find in the side door of the cockpit. The pilot, Bruce Gordon, glances back and nods with...
You Lookin' at Me?
Byline: John Ericson Be careful using eye contact: It can backfire. Sure, you've always heard that steadily meeting the gaze of the person across the table shows that you're confident and trustworthy, and that you might even know what you're talking...