Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 39, November 1

10 Things You Didn't Know about Lou Reed
Byline: Alexander Nazaryan I. Norman Kingsley Mailer was born in Long Branch, New Jersey in 1923, but spent his childhood in Brooklyn, N.Y. In 1957, he wrote an essay for Dissent called "The White Negro." His argument, very briefly, is that the...
A Million Things Could Go Wrong. and Did
Byline: Tim Carmody There was a lot riding on Healthcare.gov. The site has to do many things: verify a person's identity, legal residence, and income; record his personal information; match him with health insurance plans for which he is eligible;...
Can Cannabis Cure Cancer?
Byline: Victoria Bekiempis Recent research gives new hope and meaning to the phrase "medical marijuana." In a paper published in October's Anticancer Research, Wai Liu, a senior research fellow at St. George's University of London, reports that...
Can Paul Ryan Dodge the Friendly Fire?
Byline: Pema Levy On Sunday May 15, 2011, Newt Gingrich made a big mistake. The former House speaker and then-Republican presidential contender went on NBC's Meet the Press and attacked the new budget from Representative Paul Ryan, R-Wisconsin,...
Diana: Hunted or Huntress?
Byline: Nicholas Wapshott Too soon? When it comes to Princess Diana, who died in a car crash in Paris in 1997, it seems 16 years is still not long enough of a mourning period to portray her as anything other than a Cinderella character, put upon...
Did the U.N. Herald a New Age of Cholera?
Byline: Benny Avni For decades, Haiti was plagued by every human-made and natural disaster imaginable. But for more than a century it hasn't recorded an outbreak of cholera, a disease that thrives in an environment where sanitation infrastructure...
Hello, Mudder!
Byline: John Walters "I have an impressively high pain tolerance level," says Amelia Boone, the queen of the mud runs. "Stitches. Dental procedures. They don't bother me. I underwent laser hair removal for my underarms, and I had heard that was...
How Edward Snowden Escalated Cyber War
Byline: Kurt Eichenwald For more than a decade, a relentless campaign by China to steal valuable, confidential information from United States corporations flourished with barely a peep from Washington. And now it might never be stopped. The secret...
See You, Banksy. Hello, Invader
Byline: Connor Sheets As Banksy's mega-hyped New York City "street residency" ends, works by another of the world's most famous street artists started appearing on the facades of buildings on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. Invader, the Paris-based...
Slumming It
Byline: Karla Zabludovsky As the van revs its engine and chugs up the hill, passengers - scooped up from some of the most high-end hotels in Rio de Janeiro just minutes ago - crane their necks out and up, straining for the first glimpse of what...
Surviving the Hemingways
Byline: Abigail Jones When you're interviewing someone who has spent much of her professional career sitting exactly where you are - setting up the recorder, asking the questions rather than answering them - there is a point when you sense that...
The 10 Scariest Movies and Why They Creep Us Out
Byline: Barbara Herman You don't need anyone to explain why you should be afraid of a homicidal maniac with an ax, but that unease you get from the face with the rigid smile or from lookalike children? That creepy feeling has a theory that goes...
The Most Popular Kid You've Never Heard Of
Byline: Tracey Harrington McCoy There aren't a lot of people with more than 280 million views on YouTube. Katy Perry's channel has 272 million. ESPN has 328 million. Madonna clocks in at 275 million and Funny or Die is getting close with 266 million....
The Problem with Healthcare.gov Is Yahoos
Byline: Kevin Maney A societal line has been crossed with Healthcare.gov: The web has become too important to leave to people who can't do it well. Healthcare.gov is America's first full-blown national crisis over a website. We've had hearings...
Up in Smoke
Byline: Lecia Bushak Scientists are learning more about why it can be so hard to quit smoking. Sure, nicotine is a fiercely addictive drug - but that's only part of the story. Just look at all the millions of would-be ex-smokers who keep on lighting...
Was Chevron Scammed for $19 Billion?
Byline: Victoria Bekiempis Even by the standards of a legally battle-tested oil industry, the Chevron trial is ugly. In the case before U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan, Chevron puts forth that Steven Donziger, a New York lawyer, masterminded...
What's Bugging the Head of the NSA?
Byline: Jeff Stein Around the CIA's executive suites a few years ago, General Keith Alexander was known as "The Weasel." Not a weasel, The Weasel. "He'd leave the room after some briefing or meeting or whatever and we'd all look at each other,"...
What's God Got to Do with It?
Byline: Paul Hoggart It's a crisp, sunny Sunday morning in central London. The hall in Red Lion Square is packed. Onstage, a choir belts out a rousing anthem while members of the congregation sing along, waving their arms and swaying gleefully...
Wikipedia's Wobbling (Citation Needed)
Byline: Katie J.M. Baker Wikipedia is dying! Wikipedia is dying! That's the line parroted by the media every six months or so since 2009, when Spanish researcher Felipe Ortega first noticed that unprecedented numbers of volunteer editors were abandoning...