Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 40, November 8

And They're Off
Byline: Pema Levy It may be three years away, but the 2016 presidential election cast a long shadow over the races for governor in New Jersey and Virginia. Now the results are in, it begs the question: What does the re-election of a Republican governor...
Baby You Can Drive My Car
Byline: Janine di Giovanni Benjamin Franklin once wrote that there are three types of people in this world: "those that are immovable, those that are movable, and those that move." Manal al-Sharif, a 34-year-old computer scientist, is in the process...
Cold Turkey
Byline: Benny Avni Turkey is looking around for new allies - and that is not good news for America. Although Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has long been essential to President Barack Obama's strategy in the eastern Mediterranean and the...
Eating Our Words
Byline: Alexander Nazaryan The restaurant Do or Dine, in Brooklyn's Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood, has won widespread acclaim for its foie gras donut. One of the kids behind it, Justin Warner, even got his own Food Network show, the short-lived...
From Mortal Enemies to Facebook Friends
Byline: Katya Cengel They were never really enemies. That is what Nguyen Hong My likes to say - as if they were college football rivals, not members of opposing militaries in a war that claimed the lives of more than 58,000 Americans and several...
Full-Term Crisis
Byline: Nadia-Elysse Harris It could be an old-style good-news/bad-news joke if not for one detail: There's nothing funny about it. According to a "report card" just issued by the March of Dimes, the rate of premature births in the United States...
Ripping You off A Penny at a Time
Byline: David Cay Johnston A fabulously successful new way to get rich in America is spreading fast, yet hardly anyone but those building these new fortunes knows about it. The genius of this technique is that it requires virtually no capital, involves...
Starbucks V. Starbungs
Byline: Hugh Gallagher The sun in Bangkok doesn't shine, it hates. High noon in the world's hottest city hits like a trashcan lid in the face as heaving, pollution spewing traffic slaughters your breath. Money stays home, and people with just sense...
The Grass Is Greener on the Gridiron
Byline: John Walters Two years ago, Joe Moglia, then 62, encountered an obstacle very few former Fortune 500 CEOs with a net worth on the fat side of nine figures ever face: a glass ceiling. Moglia, the former CEO of TD Ameritrade, coveted a...
The Lush Life of William T. Vollmann
Byline: Alexander Nazaryan If William T. Vollmann ever wins the Nobel Prize in Literature - as many speculate he will - he knows exactly what he will do with the $1.1 million pot the Swedes attach to the award. "It will be fun to give some to prostitutes,"...
The Making of a Neo-Nazi Queen
Byline: Elisabeth Braw What would Sigmund Freud make of it all? Later this month, Annerose Zschape, a modest German woman who works in a government job-creation business, will take the witness stand in a Munich court in the trial of her daughter,...
Too Buggy to Hack
Byline: Jeff Stein In the vast river of documents and charts flowing from Edward Snowden, only a few of the CIA's have bubbled to the surface, even though the fugitive whistle-blower worked for the spy agency nearly as long as he did for the NSA...
Waiting for the Next Revolution
Byline: Pete Guest Amadou Janneh knows firsthand the price of resistance in the Gambia. He was in prison in September last year when nine prisoners were dragged from the cells around him and taken to the firing squad. None had more than a moment's...
'We'll Need an MRI on Your Wallet'
Byline: Peter Sergo How much bad news is your doctor obliged to give you? Consider this very depressing scenario: You've got colon cancer. Your doctor might tell you there's some good news, that there's a powerful and effective drug called Avastin,...
We're All on Crack
Byline: Alexander Nazaryan The defense proffered by Toronto mayor Rob Ford, caught in a video smoking crack, is astoundingly, bracingly forthright: "Yes, I have smoked crack cocaine.... Probably in one of my drunken stupors, probably approximately...
What's the NSA Going to Do with Your Data?
Byline: Kevin Maney We are all Angela Merkel. Today, the National Security Agency can tap the German chancellor's phone, monitor her electronic activity and use computer analysis to attempt to figure out whether she's plotting to undermine American...
You Gotta Believe in Nothing
Byline: Katie J.M. Baker Jacob Link, 22, wryly describes growing up a megachurch poster child in Kissimmee, Fla., like he's performing a practiced stand-up routine. "People were always having prophetic dreams about me," he says. "I loved the attention."...