Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 41, November 15

Can He Rebound?
Byline: Pema Levy On Veterans' Day, President Obama did what all presidents do: He welcomed soldiers to the White House in the morning, laid a wreath at Arlington National Cemetery in the afternoon and posed for a gazillion pictures. But the...
Can Sotheby's Stay in the Picture?
Byline: Katrina Brooker "Without this, we would be in trouble," Tobias Meyer says. It's a warm October morning in New York City, and the head of contemporary art at Sotheby's is standing in front of a huge canvas depicting a horrific car crash,...
Center Stage
Byline: John Walters Meet John Ryan, who at a height of six-foot-ten inches is a candidate for the world's tallest person with a Napoleon complex. At every basketball practice at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), Ryan finds himself posting...
Face: The Final Frontier
Byline: Kevin Maney Wearable gadgets like smart watches and Google Glass can seem like a fad that has all the durability of CB radios or Duran Duran, but they're important early signs of a new era of technology that will drive investment and innovation...
Failing Up
Byline: Leah McGrath Goodman Could the nation's economy be rated so lowly that it's underrated? Perhaps. If the Dow's 35 record highs this year are a sign of what the future holds, it seems the Sturm und Drang in the run-up to the Congressional...
For Sale: One Used Castello
Byline: Silvia Marchetti Ever dreamed of owning a frescoed Renaissance castello or a rural estate in Tuscany? Now's the time for great deals. In the wake of the euro crisis and rising public debt, the Italian government is having a fire sale...
Pacific Drift
Byline: Benny Avni The arrival of the aircraft carrier U.S.S. George Washington into the storm-torn Philippines must have brought a ray of hope to the devastated victims of Typhoon Haiyan. Hauling massive amounts of food and water, the carrier,...
Rebel Massacre Signals a Turning Point in Syria
Byline: Janine di Giovanni They attacked before the sun rose, toward the end of Ramadan. In the August heat, soldiers went from house to house in the small Alawite villages near the al-Akrad mountains, delivering death and terror. The inhabitants...
Seriously Down Under
Byline: Mark Johnson "When I see the earth, my palms get itchy," says Trevor Berry. The Adelaide native first came to the largely subterranean town of Coober Pedy in South Australia's mineral-rich outback on a school trip when he was 13. He thought...
Still Wanted, Dead or Alive
Byline: Phil Klay On June 16, 2006, Iraqi insurgents attacked a military checkpoint near Yusufiyah, Iraq, killing Specialist David J. Babineau and capturing Pfc. Kristian Menchaca and Pfc. Thomas L. Tucker. Immediately, the U.S. launched a massive...
The Biggest Little CIA Shop You've Never Heard Of
Byline: Jeff Stein A few years ago, an American company placed a want ad for an aerospace engineering consultant in an Asian newspaper. It quickly drew a flurry of applicants - one of whom was just the kind of person the company was looking for:...
The Burgundy Backchannel
Byline: Owen Matthews Historic talks in Geneva to broker a deal with Iran to abandon its nuclear weapons program grounded to a halt last weekend without agreement. But a dialogue begun at the same time during a secret meeting of Iranian, Israeli,...
The Original Wrecking Ball
Byline: Gogo Lidz In the past 60 years two Nashville gals have kicked up a ruckus with their exuberant, naughty-but-nice posing - singer Miley Cyrus and pin-up queen Bettie Page. Neither could be described as the Girl Next Door: The former markets...
Time for the FDA to Muscle Up?
Byline: Susan Scutti Earlier this month, the popular bodybuilding supplement Craze was pulled from stores on American military bases. It wasn't due to ineffectiveness or because of an isolated problem with a contaminated batch. No, the removal was...
Turkey Fry, No Third-Degree Burns
Byline: Marissa Rothkopf Bates I have long believed that a turkey-frying enthusiast willing to spend a big chunk of his Thanksgiving outdoors, hovering over a huge pot of boiling oil, isn't really in search of moist breast meat; he just wants nothing...
Twitter's New Owners: Big Institutions
Byline: Anna Bernasek While Twitter's successful IPO stole all the headlines, a continuing trend in the stock market has gotten little attention: the vanishing small investor. It's a pretty good bet you didn't by any TWTR shares: The company's...
Vexed by Vitamins
Byline: Victoria Bekiempis Talk about a bitter pill: Vitamins might not do anything to prevent cancer or cardiovascular disease. According to a new report from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, there's not enough evidence to suggest that...
Vino? No Thanks. We're Italian
Byline: Abigail Jones Bacchus would be so disappointed. Italy, the world's No. 1 wine-producing nation - whose history is steeped in the growing, cultivating, selling, and consuming of wine - is drinking less of it these days. Meanwhile, the...
Will Syrian Polio Spread to Europe?
Byline: Susan Scutti A recent polio outbreak in Syria, coupled with reports of polio virus found in Israeli sewers, is causing anxiety in Europe. As Syrians flee the chaos of civil war and seek refuge on the continent, German scientists warn that...