Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 43, November 29

A Good God Is Hard to Find
Byline: Alexander Nazaryan No conviction in modern theology is more foolish than that of a nice God, a benevolent genie eager to grant our wishes, to fulfill the "purpose-driven life" we were always meant to lead, but just hadn't prayed quite hard...
A Gut Reaction
Byline: Susan Scutti Your Thanksgiving dinner could be going to your thighs in more ways than one. Since low doses of antibiotics have been used to promote weight gain in food animals since the 1950s, it should come as no surprise that America's...
Air on the Side of Caution
Byline: Hugh Gallagher China has big plans for planes. As recently reported in a Fortune cover story, its state-owned aviation plants are pouring billions of dollars into a determined effort to break their dependency on the West. Working on a timeline...
A Teachable Moment for Your Computer
Byline: Ben Wolford Since July, a computer in Pittsburgh has been doing nothing but looking at millions of pictures, 24/7. Each minute, it flips through another thousand images of mundane, everyday things like cars and airplanes, turtles and geese....
Behold! the 80th Eighth Wonder of the World!
Byline: Karla Zabludovsky With aching ankles and leaden thighs, I pressed my hands on top of my knees to hoist myself up above the last slippery boulder. Finally, there it was: the pinkish, other-worldly towers of Chile's Torres del Paine National...
Crooks at the Top
Byline: Elisabeth Braw In two weeks, Bettina Wulff will testify in the trial of her estranged husband, Christian Wulff, the former president of Germany who stands accused of taking bribes. The hearing is the latest in a long line of embarrassing...
Do Corporations Have a Soul?
Byline: David Cay Johnston Do corporations have religious rights? And if profit-making corporations enjoy religious rights, do those rights trump the legal rights of employees? This week the United States Supreme Court opened a big can of constitutional...
Every Picture Tells a Story
Byline: Karla Zabludovsky It is like something out of a Norman Rockwell painting. Picture this: Three feuding brothers stand at the back of an auction room and watch anxiously as famous pictures their father gave them go under the hammer. ...
Gadget Lust: Morning Becomes Electric
Byline: Marissa Rothkopf Bates I am of the school that believes you should be able to prepare and cook an entire three-course meal with just a saute pan, a good chef's knife, and a glass of decent wine. Any other tools are merely clutter. When I...
Go! Go! Go!
Byline: Hugh Gallagher People often complain that life is complicated. They're wrong. With the acceleration of information, the changing economy, the intricacies of global interconnectivity, and the massive upheaval in digital communications, life...
Hard to Kill: The TB Superbug
Byline: Polly J. Price You might not recall hearing about an undocumented Nepalese man who was picked up by U.S. border cops in south Texas a year ago. His case didn't make the news at first, perhaps because federal health officials wanted to avoid...
I Know Why the Caged Composer Sang
Byline: Nicholas Wapshott Like many musicians, artists, and filmmakers in the 1950s, Leonard Bernstein, the flamboyant conductor of the New York Philharmonic and composer of West Side Story, was forced to defend his political views, his friends,...
Inside the Company That Bungled Obamacare
Byline: Lynnley Browning When 200 of CGI Federal's top managers gathered at the luxurious Nemacolin Woodlands Resort in southwestern Pennsylvania on a brisk day in early November 2009, they found time for business - and high jinks. During the...
Obama's Chinese Checkers
Byline: Benny Avni This week's American military pushback against China will trigger a major crisis that could, as long promised by President Obama, force America to "pivot" much of its attention to Asia. Or it could be a one-shot action that will...
Plus-Sized Women Want Yoga Chic, Too
Byline: Katie J.M. Baker Thanks to high-end workout gear line Lululemon, yoga is no longer just a spiritual discipline: It's an aspirational branding opportunity. The company, founded in 2000, has a massive, cult-like following of juice cleanse-guzzling,...
Say Good-Bye to Hickory High
Byline: John Walters Late November augurs the start of the high school basketball season and with it, in our increasingly sports-obsessed ecosystem, national high school basketball rankings. USA Today provides a preseason Top 25, as do the prep-centric...
The FDA Doesn't Want You to Unzip Your Genes
Byline: Victoria Bekiempis The Food and Drug Administration recently ordered 23andMe to stop selling its popular DIY genetic screening service which, with a simple saliva swab, promises to provide, the FDA notes, "health reports on 254 disease and...
The War against Children
Byline: Janine di Giovanni He was wandering through the dusty camp somewhere inside Syria like a shadow, his small, disfigured head covered by a blue sweatshirt. When he turned his scarred face towards the sun, it revealed a skull with a hole for...
Why Health Insurance Is a Crummy Deal
Byline: Anna Bernasek Assuming the government can fix the Healthcare.gov website, millions of Americans will have to do something they've never done before: shop for a plan. This is where it gets tricky. Yes, insurance is good to have. But that...