The National Interest

A bimonthly digest of national and international politic affairs. Articles feature essays and debate on the interactions and relationships between the United States and other nations.

Articles from No. 93, January-February

Black Is the New Green
THE INTERSECTION of ongoing structural shifts in international energy markets with strategic trends in global financial markets poses the most profound challenge to American hegemony since the end of the Cold War. In 2006, Pierre Noel and I wrote in...
Climatic Engineering
THE POLITICS of global warming is heating up. Activists are often taking sharply opposing sides on nearly every one of the warming issues. Trite and ad boc political arguments intrude unapologetically upon the science of climatology. But thoughtful...
Double or Nothing
THE UNITED States cannot afford to maintain its current strategy, planning for both traditional war and the entire spectrum of stability operations, without making it a top priority to double the current size of its armed forces. Since such an expansion...
FDR's Children
Dennis Ross, Statecraft: And How to Restore America's Standing in the World (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2007), 384 pp., $26.00. Amitai Etzioni, Security First: For a Muscular; Moral Foreign Policy (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press,...
Foggy Bloggom
MY NAME is David Frum, and I am a blogger. Every day I post some hundreds of words of commentary at the National Review website--often (to fulfill the cliche) while still wearing my pajamas. But I am also a proud, suit-wearing member of the foreign-policy...
The Bell Tolls for NATO
THE DAY the coalition forces invaded Iraq in March 2003, the conflict in Afghanistan became a sideshow for the United States. By default, it became the main event for NATO. Yet, the operation could be NATO's death knell, unless its members begin to...
The Changing of the Guard
Anthony H. Cordesman and Martin Kleiber, Chinese Military Modernization: Force Development and Strategic Capabilities (Washington, DC: Center for Strategic and International Studies, 2007), 226 pp., $24.95. Bates Gill, Rising Star: China's New Security...
The End of Multiculturalism
FUTURE GENERATIONS may look back on Iraq and immigration as the two great disasters of the Bush presidency. Ironically, for a conservative administration, both of these policy initiatives were rooted in a multicultural view of the world. Since the...
The Palmerstonian Moment
THE 44th president of the United States will assume the job at a time when the country he (or she) leads will be stretched militarily, dependent on enormous daily inflows of oil and dollars, vulnerable to many of the darker manifestations of globalization...
The Road to Recovery
THE U.S. predicament in Iraq and other foreign-policy troubles have prompted a new realism from the Bush Administration. From an increasingly pragmatic approach to North Korea and Iran to a scaling back of the "freedom agenda" in the Middle East, caution...
The Three Rs: Rivalry, Russia, 'Ran
Year after year the worriers and fretters would come to me with awful predictions of the outbreak of war. I denied it each time. I was only wrong twice. --Senior British intelligence official, retiring in 1950 after 47 years of service Man's...
The World Is Not Enough
IN THE last issue of The National Interest, David Victor argued that the threat of resource wars is overplayed and overblown. To recap: RISING ENERGY prices and mounting concerns about environmental depletion have animated fears that the world...
Three Years and You're Out
AS THE insurgencies in Iraq and Afghanistan fester and grow, we need to face facts. Americans are only prepared to support major counterinsurgency operations for about three years. Yet, when the United States enters a war, it doesn't base its strategy,...