Papers on Language & Literature

Literary history, theory, and interpretation.

Articles from Vol. 36, No. 1, Winter

Crisis and Recovery: The Wordsworthian Poetics and Politics
Between late 1795 and late 1796, Wordsworth was known to have suffered a sudden and deep depression. Recollecting the ferocious onslaught of that debilitating experience years later in the song of his life, Wordsworth himself would hauntingly summarize...
Freud and the Psychology of Neurosis: John Guare's Bosoms and Neglect
John Guare's Bosoms and Neglect, which was written in 1979 and premiered at the Goodman Theater in Chicago on 1 March of that year, is primarily concerned with exploring how individuals in contemporary society attempt to connect with each other in...
Notes on Contributors
Robert S. Fredrickson has published another essay on Stone in PLL, "Robert Stone's Decadent Leftists," (Summer 1996). He has published essays on Whitman, John Gardner, and Joyce Cary, as well as a book Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen, a nineteenth- century...
Rewriting the Self against the National Text: Ernest Hemingway's the Garden of Eden
Then the Lord God said, "Behold, the man has become like one of Us, knowing good and evil; and now, lest he stretch out his hand, and take also from the tree of life, and eat, and live forever"-therefore the Lord God sent him out from the garden of...
Robert Stone's Opium of the People: Religious Ambivalence in Damascus Gate
That Robert Stone has written another novel, Damascus Gate, with a central figure resembling those drugged and detached men of his earlier work leads us to ponder why he repeatedly so situates his readers in relation to his stories. Christopher Lucas,...
The Love Song of Satin-Legs Smith: Gwendolyn Brooks Revisits Prufrock's Hell
Gwendolyn Brooks's poem "The Sundays of Satin-Legs Smith" (1944) alludes unobtrusively throughout to T. S. Eliot's "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" (1915), which in turn refers both explicitly and implicitly to Dante's Inferno (1321). Together,...