Papers on Language & Literature

Literary history, theory, and interpretation.

Articles from Vol. 30, No. 4, Fall

Evelyn Waugh's Early Novels: The Limits of Fiction
Apart from his own willingness to classify himself as an entertainer, one of the major reasons for the general view of Evelyn Waugh's early novels as frivolous is that they betray little in the way of overt philosophical content. While it is true that...
"Into the Body of Another": Mary Oliver and the Poetics of Becoming Other
"We belong to the moon," says Mary Oliver, and "the most/thoughtful among us dreams/of hurrying down...into the body of another" (49-50). We dream, we long, and some of us believe that we can step outside of ourselves and enter the body of another....
Mary Shelly on the Therapeutic Value of Language
The therapeutic value of oral and written self-expression is a recurrent theme in Mary Shelley's works, particularly in those works, such as Mathilda and Valperga: or, the Life and Adventures of Castruccio, Prince of Lucca, in which the heroines have...
The Other Case: Gender and Narration in Charlotte Bronte's 'The Professor.'
Male novelists who use female narrators have been praised for their insights into "feminine psychology," yet we seldom expect women writers to represent masculinity from a male point of view. In her recent work on feminism and narratology, Susan Lanser...
The Roots of Beckett's Aesthetic: Mathematical Allusions in 'Watt.' (Samuel Beckett)
Samuel Beckett's use of mathematics to represent the discourse of fiction may at first seem ironic. Mathematics is a language of precision; it keeps undefined terms at a minimum; it makes common agreement about the meaning of certain terms (definitions)...
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