Papers on Language & Literature

Literary history, theory, and interpretation.

Articles from Vol. 39, No. 4, Fall

"And Everyone and I Stopped Breathing": William Carlos Williams, Frank O'Hara, and the News of the Day in Verse
It is difficult to get the news from poems, yet men die miserably every day for lack of what is found there. --William Carlos Williams "Asphodel, That Greeny Flower" The above line from "Asphodel, That Greeny Flower" expresses Williams's belief...
"A Sense of Something Lost": The Unlived Jamesian Life in Algernon Blackwood's "The Tryst"
The last few decades of the nineteenth century and the first two of the twentieth have often been described as "the golden age of the English ghost story" (Cox and Gilbert xiii). This was a rarified time "when authors excelled themselves at producing"...
"Culture and Corruption": Paterian Self-Development versus Gothic Degeneration in Oscar Wilde's the Picture of Dorian Gray
"Culture and corruption," murmured Dorian, "I have known something of both." --Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray I hold that no work of art can be tried otherwise than by laws deduced from itself: whether or not it be consistent with itself...
"No Ties except Those of Blood": Class, Race, and Jack London's American Plague
Upton Sinclair in The Jungle (1906), a book littered with references to disease--tuberculosis, cholera, spoiled meat and (Sinclair's larger point) the "monstrous disease" of industrial capitalism--permits himself the phrase "the germ of hope" in referring...