Papers on Language & Literature

Literary history, theory, and interpretation.

Articles from Vol. 49, No. 1, Winter

"A Fantastic, Unwholesome Little Dream": The Illusion of Reality and Sexual Politics in H. G. Wells's: The Sea Lady
When H. G. Wells's The Sea Lady was first published in 1902, the reviewer in Academy and Literature expressed admiration, remarking how this amusing story of a mermaid's terrestrial excursion "makes a double appeal. It is full of fun; yet it is at...
"(And You Get Far Too Much Publicity Already Whoever You Are)": Gossip, Celebrity, and Modernist Authorship in Evelyn Waugh's Vile Bodies
The social column should not be scorned. [... I]t is indispensable [sic] to our analysis of the epoch. --Patrick Balfour, Society Racket: A Critical Survey of Modern Social Life Vile Bodies (1930) is widely identified as Evelyn Waugh's most experimental...
From Panophilia to Phallophobia: Sublimation and Projection in D. H. Lawrence's St. Mawr
"A man who should see Pan by daylight fell dead." --D. H. Lawrence, "Pan in America" "Here we have one of the origins of artistic activity." --Sigmund Freud, Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality "Who does not know Turner's Picture of...
Peter Carey's Jack Maggs: Re-Doing Dickens's Re-Doings of Dickens
The late twentieth century and the early years of the twenty-first have seen a number of novels that make prominent use of nineteenth-century (mostly Victorian) settings, customs, and mores but that reconstruct that period with strategies and per-spectives...