Reason

A leading social and political commentary magazine offering a refreshing alternative to Washington-based opinion. Focus is on free markets while covering politics, culture, and ideas through a mix of news, analysis, commentary and reviews..

Articles from Vol. 32, No. 10, March

A Riot of Our Own
Didn't like the recent anti-globalist, anti-capitalist street actions in Seattle and Washington, D.C.? Then maybe you should have caught New Delhi's riots last November. India's capital was shut down even tighter than the American cities; crowds of...
Balance Sheet
ASSETS * Trending Up. By 2015, "Governments will have less and less control over flows of information, technology, diseases, migrants, arms, and financial transactions." Or so says a 70-page CIA report on the future. Globalization is to blame, and...
Big Blue Men
Downtown artists capture Las Vegas Las Vegas has long been known as the place where once-cool performers go to die slow, campy deaths (think Sinatra) and where never-hip singers build inexplicably large, devoted followings (think Wayne Newton)....
Caesar vs. Christ
Pastors and congregants of the Indianapolis Baptist Temple had been holed up inside their church for over 50 days as of early January, awaiting an inevitable assault by federal marshals--not because of suspected illegal weapon sales or child abuse,...
D.C. Downers
In which our man in Washington listens to the drug czar babble and learns why we can't afford tax cuts. Subj: The general's will Date: 12/19/2000 From: mwLynch@reason.com Spent a morning last Tuesday at the Heritage Foundation, listening...
Down in the Flood
The Coen brothers' new movie recalls a federal agency with a screwball story of its own. For fans of bluegrass music and electoral hanky-panky, the Coen brothers' new movie, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, offers a hit parade for the ages. The power...
Epic Jazz
Ken Burns' latest film teaches an unintended lesson in musical ecstasy The opening note of Jazz, Ken Burns' 10-part documentary for PBS (available on video), comes from trumpeter Wynton Marsalis, who's not playing but lecturing. "Jazz music objectifies...
Independent Airwaves
Few people expect critiques of public broadcasting to come from the left, and certainly not from a leftist who reveres the idea of noncommercial radio and television. But Jerold Starr, author of Air Wars: The Fight to Reclaim Public Broadcasting (Beacon,...
Intolerant Alliance
Censors of right and left have been cooperating for years. Punditry rests on a foundation of easy stereotypes, cliches that make it easier to fit one's ideas into a short op-ed or even shorter soundbite. So when social conservatives and liberal...
Is Russia on the Road to Recovery?
Alvin Rabushka is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution. Since 1991, living standards in Russia have fallen by 47 percent. The 1990s have witnessed serial defaults, currency devaluations, and continuous contraction. This year, for the first...
Jerk Protection
"It was not a proud moment for the City of Lago Vista." That's how three judges on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit summed up Gall Atwater's encounter with local police officer Bart Turek on the afternoon of March 26, 1997. Atwater was...
Letters
Ballot Tampering As an Arizona resident, I appreciated "Ballot Tampering" by Jeffrey A. Singer (December). This is not the only time the courts have blocked a citizens' initiative effort to curtail state power. About 20 years ago, the National Taxpayers...
Many Americas
Don't confuse the electoral vote map with the territory. Whether you think the Electoral College is a silly archaism that frustrates the people's will or a time-tested institution that helps preserve our republic, one thing is certain: That red-and-blue...
Moving Words
Imagine you're sitting on a bus or a train. You look up and, amid the ads for ambulance-chasing attorneys and laser-wielding dermatologists, notice a picture of two police officers. The text reads, "Police are too important... to waste on arresting...
Overlawyered & Overgoverned
An annual helping of tales from a litigious society. How were we governed, regulated, policed, lawyered, and judged in 2000? Sadly, much the same as in 1999. Here are some of last year's month-by-month "highlights": January: New York City announced...
Stuffing Envelopes
Does recent research prove we're altruists--or does it suggest something darker about us? This is a story about some economists who set out to study altruism and ended up discovering something very frightening about human nature. Altruism itself...
The 13th Step
Even some drug war opponents buy into its lies. Why is it that ostensibly pro-drug movies can never quite deliver the goods, can never quite depict drug use as something other than depraved? When Trainspotting hit American theaters in 1996, the...
The Legacy of Election 2000
George Bush won. But at what cost to the law? Two legal analysts offer differing assessments. Constitutional litigation will return to normal, but the political battles are just getting started. What is the moral of the Great Florida Recount?...
The Supreme Court Shot Itself in the Foot While Shooting Down Al Gore
For any constitutionalist, the proper reaction to the U.S. Supreme Court's majority opinion in Bush v. Gore is dismay. In dispensing with the Florida high court's efforts to resolve a confusing election-code tangle, derailing the election-contest process...
The Whipping Boy
The hidden conflicts underlying the campaign against violent TV Although television violence has never been shown to cause hostile behavior, its sinister reputation lives on. This is because the issue masks a variety of other struggles. Many of...