Science News

Science newspaper is a magazine specializing in Science topics.

Articles from Vol. 146, No. 7, August 13

Adapting to Adoption: Adopted Kids Generate Scientific Optimism and Clinical Caution
Welcome to the adoptive family, where home life takes on a decidedly different look depending on whether it is refracted through the lens of mental health clinicians or behavioral researchers. For more than 40 years, psychiatrists and others who...
AIDS Research: From Vaccines to Safer Sex
This week, researchers from around the world met at the Tenth International AIDS Conference in Yokohama, Japan, to report scientific findings on topics ranging from vaccine development to long-term survivors of HIV infection. At the same time, several...
Brain Graft Causes Hypertension in Rats
About 90 percent of the time, physicians do not really know why a patient develops high blood pressure, a problem that affects some 63 million people in the United States. Diet, exercise, and emotions play a role (SN: 10/16/93, p.246; 12/4/93, p.380),...
Clinton Team Announces Science Policy
In a newly released report describing its national policy for science, the Clinton administration calls for stronger funding of basic science, expanded use of the peer-review system, and better recruitment of minorities into science. It also asks scientists...
Comets: Icy Studies Probe Sunny Behavior
When a comet gets too close to the sun's warming rays, some of its ice turns to vapor. The sudden transformation spews jets of vapor that drag dust out along with them, rendering the comet visible millions of kilometers from Earth. Though a familiar...
Dante Conquers the Crater, Then Stumbles
The robot explorer Dante 2 discovered last week that the road home is often the roughest. After spending 8 days successfully navigating the steaming crater of Alaska's Mt. Spurr and enduring attacks by falling boudlers, the spiderlike machine flipped...
Embryonic Machismo
Even from their earliest moments, men seem to be trying to get ahead. Men typically inherit one Y and one X chromosome, while women get two X chromosomes. Geneticists seeking to understand how this initial difference plays out during development have...
Four Awarded Fields Medals for Mathematics
From Paris to Princeton, for research subjects ranging from harmonic analysis to complex dynamics, four mathematicians have won the Fields Medal, the most prestigious award in mathematics. First presented in 1936 at the International Congress of...
Lake Apopka Pollution Hurts Bass Population
Lake Apopka near Orlando covers 38,000 acres and is one of Florida's largest freshwater lakes. It's also one of the state's most polluted. The reasons, says Tim Gross of the University of Florida in Gainesville, include a large chemical spill in 1980,...
Meaty Carcinogens: A Risk to the Cook?
Grilling meat fosters the formation of potentially cancer-causing heterocyclic amines (HCAs). To date, most investigations of the health risks posed by these compounds have focused on ingestion as the primary route of human exposure. But new research...
New Catalyst Yields One-Handed Compounds
Like a pair of hands, molecules often come in mirror-image, or chiral, forms. Though this facet of nature has many virtues, it can be troublesome to chemists seeking to synthesize a particular drug, toxin, or insecticide. Often during synthesis,...
Speech Lessons in Computero
Scientists have devised a computer system, known as a neural network, that acquires an ability to recognize different speech sounds on its own. This experiment supports the theory that babies in the final months of gestation and shortly after birth...
Topsy-Turvy Top: Revisiting the Tumbling of a Different Kind of Top
The tippe top looks like a perfectly rounded, miniature apple with a stiff, straight stem. When spun, the toy revolves on its curved bottom. As the top whirls, however, its stem dips lower and lower to the ground. Suddenly the toy flips over and begins...