Science News

Science newspaper is a magazine specializing in Science topics.

Articles from Vol. 166, No. 5, July 31

Deception Detection: Psychologists Try to Learn How to Spot a Liar
"Is he lying?" Odds are, you'll never know. Although people have been communicating with one another for tens of thousands of years, more than 3 decades of psychological research have found that most individuals are abysmally poor lie detectors. In...
Fish Stew: Species Interplay Makes Fisheries Management Tricky in the Long Run
Twice in the past 20 years, the capelin population in the Barents Sea north of Norway and Russia abruptly crashed and then took years to recover. It has again fallen sharply since 2001, in spite of restrictions on how many fish may be harvested there....
Gutless Wonder: New Symbiosis Lets Worm Feed on Whale Bones
Deep-sea researchers have discovered an oddball worm that uses a previously unknown type of symbiosis to feed on whale skeletons--even though the worms have no mouth or gut. Some other worms from the deep have no digestive systems but depend on...
Invasive Genes: Humans Incorporate DNA from Parasite
The "us-against-them" mindset may take on new meaning when applied to infections by the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. New research shows that bits of foreign DNA from the parasite become integrated into the DNA of an infected person. This...
Lighting Up the Rainbow: Color Perception Tied to Early Visual Experience
For an enlightening perspective on how primates acquire color vision, consider baby monkeys. These infants' ability to recognize basic colors in different environmental settings depends on their prior exposure to a full spectrum of colors in natural...
Parting Shots: Just as the Sun Was Calming Down, It Flared with a Vengeance
Oct. 14, 2003, dawned with a virtually spotless sun. It turned out to be the calm before the storm. During the next few days, the number and size of sunspots increased. On Oct. 18, a massive solar flare spewed from a newly visible sunspot near the...
Prion Proof? Evidence Grows for Mad Cow Protein
Even as scientist Stanley B. Prusiner was accepting a Nobel prize in 1997 for linking misfolded proteins to certain brain diseases, doubters were pointing out that no one had ever actually shown that these proteins--which Prusiner dubbed prions--could...
Universal Truths: Distant Quasars Reveal Content, Age of Universe
Using 3,000 recently discovered quasars as searchlights on the distant universe, astronomers have mapped with unprecedented precision the distribution of the diffuse gas between galaxies. By combining these measurements with observations of the faint...
Velcro Therapy: Branching Polymer Wards off Scarring after Eye Surgery
Glaucoma affects more than 3 million Americans and is the second-leading cause of blindness in the United States. Surgery can treat the disease, but the success rate is low and patients often require a second operation. Now, biomedical researchers...