Science News

Science newspaper is a magazine specializing in Science topics.

Articles from Vol. 166, No. 7, August 14

Curbing Allergy to Insect Venom: Therapy Stops Reactions to Stings Years Later
Immunizing adults against insect-sting allergies has proved highly effective since it was first tested in the 1970s. But while many children receive shots for allergies such as hay fever, they're much less likely than adults to receive allergy shots...
Don't Let the Bugs Bite: Can Genetic Engineering Defeat Diseases Spread by Insects?
Celia Cordon-Rosales wants to build a ghost town. A dozen small thatch and adobe huts would stand in several clusters. A few pigs would occupy nearby pens, insects would buzz to and fro, and bacteria would live out unremarkable lives. But the mock...
Glowing Trio under the Sea: Nitrogen Fixer Joins. Algae Inside Coral
A Caribbean coral that fluoresces orange appears to be the first ever found to contain a symbiotic microbe that converts elemental nitrogen into a biologically usable form, as bacteria in the roots of bean plants do. The glow of Montastraea cavernosa...
Growth Spurt: Teenage Tyrannosaurs Packed on the Pounds
Detailed analyses of fossils of Tyrannosaurus rex and some of its more ancient kin suggest that the creatures experienced an extended surge in growth during adolescence, putting on as much as half their adult weight in a mere 4 years. T. rex, one...
HIV Drugs May Stop Cervical Disease
A drug combination commonly given to people with HIV, the AIDS virus, can knock out precancerous growths on a woman's cervix, a new study indicates. Previous research had suggested that HIV-positive women are particularly susceptible to such growths,...
Joint Effort: Bacteria in Yogurt Combat Arthritis in Rats
Consuming either dairy foods or certain types of bacteria may fight arthritis, research in laboratory rats suggests. Yogurt that contains live bacteria appears to be particularly effective against the inflammatory joint disorder. Various bacteria,...
Mechanism Suggested for Guam Illness
A research team has invoked protein chemistry to propose a solution to one of the most puzzling parts of Guam's longstanding neuroscience mystery. During the 20th century, the prevalence of the neurologic disease called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism...
One of Hubble's Tools Fails: Observatory Loses a Sharp Ultraviolet Eye
Last week, an instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope stopped working, shutting astronomers' only sharp ultraviolet eye on the universe. On Aug. 3, a malfunction--possibly a short circuit--developed in a 5-volt power supply that drives moving parts...
Protecting Baby: Calcium in Pregnancy Reduces Lead Exposure
The danger of lead poisoning is well known, but how best to protect infants from its effects hasn't been established. Scientists have now shown that by taking calcium supplements during pregnancy, a mother can significantly reduce the lead exposure...
Savvy Sieve: Carbon Nanotubes Filter Petroleum, Polluted Water
Bridging the gap between the nanoworld and the macroworld, researchers have created a membrane out of carbon nanotubes and demonstrated its potential for filtering petroleum and treating contaminated drinking water. Scientists have long valued carbon...
To Err Is Human: Influential Research on Our Social Shortcomings Attracts a Scathing Critique
It's a story of fear, loathing, and crazed college boys trapped in perhaps the most notorious social psychology study of all time. In the 1971 Stanford Prison Experiment, psychologist Philip G. Zimbardo randomly assigned male college students to roles...