Endangered Species Update

Technical environmental journal.

Articles from Vol. 22, No. 1, January-March

Agencies Streamline Permit Process
"I came here expecting to complain about problems. But after listening to what you've done and what you're planning to do next, I'm disappointed to say that I can't find anything to complain about." The speaker, an experienced county commissioner...
A Partnership to Grow Plovers on the Plains
The first explorers to cross the "Great American Desert," the area we now call the high plains, observed large flocks of mountain plovers (Charadrius montanus). These birds laid their eggs on the ground in prairie dog towns and other short-grass prairie...
Condors Take Flight in Oregon Zoo's Conservation Facility
The Oregon Zoo is "flying high" in their quest to restore wild condors to their native habitat in the Pacific Northwest. The California condor once ranged throughout the Pacific Northwest, displaying a magnificent wingspan of over nine feet and diving...
Conservation Status of Coral Reef Fishes in the Florida Keys
Abstract This article identifies coral reef fishes that may deserve a high conservation priority in the Florida Keys. Expert observations between 1993 and 2004 from the REEF database (n = 5,783) identified 114 coral reef fishes that occur in the...
Endangered Species, Prescribed Fires, and Public Resistance in a Florida Scrub Communities
Abstract Endangered species management in pyrogenic communities is often complicated by the politics of prescribed fire use. Public resistance to fires had been instilled culturally through past fire suppression policies, in addition to a fear of...
Giving Nature a Second Chance
In 1999, when the George's River chapter of Trout Unlimited and other river restoration supporters began to advocate removing Sennebec Dam on the St. George River of Maine, it looked like the start of a classic environmental confrontation. River and...
How the Swift Fox Escaped the List
Under the U.S. Constitution, most fish and wildlife management responsibilities in our country are retained by the states and tribes. The exceptions, trust species such as migratory birds, anadromous fish, and species listed under the Endangered Species...
Joining Forces for an Island of Biodiversity
Nestled in the rain shadow of the Sierra Cristal, the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, has baked in sleepy isolation from the other biodiversity hot spots of the Western Caribbean for more than 100 years. Now that "GTMO" has been thrust into...
Karner Blue Butterflies and Necedah NWR
The Karner blue butterfly (Lycaedes melissa samuelis) has been endangered primarily by habitat loss, much of which has been due to urbanization and wildfire prevention (Andow et al. 1994). The lack of wildfires has resulted in plant community succession...
One Step Closer to Key Deer Recovery
A year-long effort to translocate endangered Key deer (Odocoileus virginianus clavium) from Big Pine Key to Upper Sugarloaf Key in Florida came to fruition in June 2003 when two deer were released into a "soft release" pen, allowing them to acclimate...
Partnerships for Plant Conservation in Texas
Johnston's frankenia is a long-lived perennial endemic to three counties in western south Texas and three states of northeastern Mexico. In 1984, when the Fish and Wildlife Service listed this plant as endangered, only five populations were documented...
Partners Restore Coastal Sage Scrub Habitat
Coastal sage scrub vegetation serves as breeding habitat for a threatened bird, the coastal California gnatcatcher (Polioptila californica californica). The 4,000-acre (1,620-hectare) Starr Ranch Sanctuary, a National Audubon Society preserve in Orange...
Problems and Recommendations for the Conservation of the Maned Wolf in Argentina: Results from the First Workshop of Chrysocyon Brachyurus in Argentina and Surrounding Countries: Conservation in Situ and Ex Situ
September 12, 13, and 14, 2002 Mburucuya, Corrientes, Argentina Abstract Chrysocyon brachyurus is an endemic canid of South America. Is an "at low risk / near threatened" (international) and "endangered" (national) species. However, the information...
Recovery Planning in the 21st Century
When the Endangered Species Act (ESA) was passed 30 years ago, it did not mention recovery plans or the need for recovery planning to chart the path for restoring a species. Instead, the ESA relied on reduction of take (through the section 9 prohibitions...
Region 3
Whooping Crane (Grus americana) The successful effort to reintroduce migratory whooping cranes to the eastern United States continued as 20 of the reintroduced whoopers migrated back to Wisconsin on their own from Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge...
Region 5
Chittenango Ovate Amber Snail (Novisuccinea chittenangoensis) Mark-release-recapture studies continued during the 2003 field season for this highly endemic, terrestrial snail. Marking studies in 2002 by the State University of New York College of Environmental...
Reproductive Success, Territory Size, and Predation Pressures of the Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma Coerulescens) at Savannas Preserve State Park
Abstract The Florida Scrub-jay is found only in the fire-dependent xeric oak communities of Florida. The number of scrub-jays statewide has been in steady decline over the past century due to the habitat loss resulting from urban development and...
Restoring the Columbian White-Tailed Deer
On July 24, 2003, decades of work to recover the Douglas County, Oregon, population of the Columbian white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus leucurus) were recognized by the removal of this animal from Endangered Species Act protection. The recovery...
Rulemaking Actions
From July through December of 2003, the Fish and Wildlife Service published the following proposed and final rules in accordance with the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The full text of each action can be found on the internet at http://endangered.fws.gov....
The Upper San Pedro Partnership
People have lived in the desert Southwest for thousands of years. To survive in this and land, early settlers had to develop special skills and adapt to a desert-based way of life. Today, communities throughout the region face a similar challenge,...
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service WASHINGTON D.C. OFFICE Washington, D.C. 20240 Steve Williams, Claire Cassel, Chief, (703) 358-2390 Director Gary Division of Partnerships Frazer, Assistant and Outreach Patrick...
Why All the Fuss over a Frog?
Scientists have known for years that frogs can tell us a lot about the health of aquatic ecosystems. Because frogs are very sensitive to changes in air and water quality, a decline in their population indicates possible problems with the health of...