Journal of Australian Studies

This quarterly journal publishes scholarly articles on Australian culture, society, history and literature.

Articles from No. 88, June

A Bishop's Wife in Torres Strait: Joan Davies 1930-49
The role of women in Australian churches, in particular of the wives of clergy, has always been a limited one in the formal sense of leadership. The churches have been seen as 'the most patriarchal of institutions' where 'a woman's work' meant Sunday...
Bitumen Films in Postcolonial Australia
In 2000, the Council for Reconciliation brought out the 'Road map' for reconciliation 'as we walk together along the reconciliation road'. (1) In May 2004, Reconciliation Australia launched 'Pathways to Reconciliation', again implicitly linking the...
'Dew to the Soul': One Australian Artist's Response to War
[The Unknown Warrior has come] from an obscure grave in France, to his last resting place in Westminster Abbey, & it is to honour his passing, symbolising as he does, the unrecorded acts, the unseen devotion, the unknown heroism of the 'Digger',...
'Feathered Foes': Soldier Settlers and Western Australia's 'Emu War' of 1932
In recent decades, post-first world war soldier settlement in Australia has been subjected to conflicting interpretations. The traditional view, espoused by historians such as Marilyn Lake in Victoria, Quentin Beresford in Tasmania, Rosemary Sparkes...
From the Murrumbidgee to Mamma Lena: Foreign Language Broadcasting on Australian Commercial Radio, Part I
In 1973 a young listener from Leichhardt, an inner-western suburb of Sydney with a substantial Italian population, was moved to write to her favourite radio host. 'I hope that we will have many more years accompanied by your enjoyable programme run...
Hunting the Wild Reciter: Elocution and the Art of Recitation
In the early 1990s I reluctantly accompanied my mother to an Australian folk music concert at a local RSL. Unusual for someone of her generation whose LP collection favoured crooners such as Al Martino and Barry Crocker, she was keen to hear the Bushwhackers...
No Flowers, or Trustees, by Request: Bernard Hall and the Felton Bequest
Philanthropy is the life-blood of large-scale cultural enterprise. Forced to compete in an aggressively affluent market, many supposedly public institutions rely for their growth, if not their existence, on the generosity of private benefactors. So...
The Populist Message of Australian Country Music
When Pauline Hanson announced that she would record a duet with country music artist Brian Letton, she observed that country music's message was similar to hers. This article concurs, and argues that the political message of Australian country music...
Vue De Sydney 1840
ETUDES DE VOYAGES GO-ROO-BOR-ROO-ROO-BOO-LO The published document that is translated here for the first time from the original French appeared in a popular nineteenth-century French journal Musee des Familles: Lectures du Soir [Museum of the...
'Walking the Wire of Prejudice': The Flying Fruit Fly Circus's 2004 Production of Skipping on Stars
Skipping on Stars Skipping on Stars, a 2004 theatrical production for young people presented by the Albury-Wodonga based Flying Fruit Fly Circus, tells the story of the life of Con Colleano, in his day the highest paid circus artist in the world....
Who Owns Gallipoli? Australia's Gallipoli Anxieties 1915-2005
Controversy over roadworks on the Gallipoli peninsula in early 2005 raised some familiar adjectives in Australia: the ground at Anzac is 'sacred', 'precious', 'of historical importance'. The words have had currency for ninety years. During the Great...
Writing the 'Long-Haired Frustrates' Back into the History of the 'Wiener Schnitzel Society': Musica Viva, 1945- 52
Musica Viva is a vital part of Australia's immigrant history. It was founded by, and, in its early years, largely dependent upon, the monies and hard work of central and southern European refugees. As a society, it formed a support network for 'New...
'You Make Me a Dot in the Nowhere': Textual Encounters in the Australian Immigration Story (the Fourth Chapter)
Along with bedtime stories featuring trios of bears, pigs and siblings, many Australians have told and been told a neat triangular story about the three phases in the history of this country's post-war immigration--assimilation, integration, and multiculturalism....