Journal of Australian Studies

This quarterly journal publishes scholarly articles on Australian culture, society, history and literature.

Articles from No. 86, January

Country: Being and Belonging on Aboriginal Lands
I have given myself a fair amount of trouble writing this piece. Usually, words come easily to me, and writer's block is a syndrome I'm not troubled by. But when I sat down to think about this thing called country, any fluency and ease evaporated....
Desert Training for Whites: Australian Road Movies
My interest in Australian road movies is motivated primarily by the desire to work within recently emerging theories of anti-racist whiteness in Australia. My concern with Australian texts and contexts was fuelled by an assumption that Australian whiteness...
Eating the Country
From the Two Fat Ladies to Rick Stein' s Seafood Odyssey and Nick Nairn' s Wild Harvest, to Australian programs such as Stephanie Alexander' s A Shared Table, and Stephano di Pieri' s Gondola on the Murray, television food programs that mix travel,...
Farewell to Arcady: Or, Getting off the Sheep's Back
This essay, like Gaul, is divided into three parts, the first of which considers sheep and the pastoral industry as a land-use; the second is about the politics of wool; the third, about Arcady in Australia, a theme that helps to explain the first...
Hegemony or Hidden Transcripts?: Aboriginal Writings from Lake Condah, 1876-1907
Sutton v. Stahle In the winter of 1876, Robert Sutton, a young Kerrupjmara resident of Lake Condah Mission Station in south-western Victoria, took the unprecedented step of issuing a summons against the station superintendent, Reverend John Heinrich...
'Memories in the Landscape': The Role of Performance in Naming, Knowing, and Claiming Yanyuwa Country
The small remote community of Borroloola in the southwest Gulf region of the Northern Territory, approximately 970 kilometres southeast of Darwin and 80 kilometres inland, is today home to Yanyuwa people. Yanyuwa people traditionally identify themselves...
Public Space and Private Interests
The law doth punish man or woman That steals the goose from off the common But lets the greater felon loose That steals the common from the goose (Anon., On The Enclosures, eighteenth century) The core question that I pose here concerns the issue...
Sacred Ground: An Exploration
Some of us are becoming accustomed to paying tribute to the 'Country' on which we find ourselves when speaking or giving a paper. This is not, I suggest, mere tokenism. Iplicitly if not explicitly it signals an epistemological or even ontological uneasiness,...
'Same Time Poison, Same Time Good Tucker': The Cycad Palm in the South West Gulf of Carpentaria
The use of cycad fruit as a dietary staple has always caused interest amongst researchers because of its extremely toxic and carcinogenic qualities, and because of the meticulous, labour-intensive methods required to prepare it for eating. (1) Available...
Settling in the Land of Wine and Honey: Cultural Tourism, Local History and Some Australian Legends
Rural mythology has historically provided an important focus for cultural explanations of Australian national identity. Since the early 1960s, however, rural myths-especially those represented through the Australian Legend-have been subjected to searching...
Shopping Malls Country: Reading the Central Coast of NSW
When I moved from Adelaide to the Central Coast of New South Wales in October 1998, to take up my current academic appointment, I was surprised to find that the two regional shopping malls--Erina Fair and Tuggerah Mall--were the hubs of the 'new' region,...
Stammering 'Country' Pedagogies: Sickness for and of the Home
'Do not shoot ... I am a B-b-british object!' (David Malouf, Remembering Babylon) 'the detours and blockages of the stutter with its rejection of familiar endings' (Sandra Buckley, 'An Aesthetics of the Stutter') The first register on the sensory...
Sublime Utility: Early Tourism Propaganda and the Cairns-Kuranda Railway
The opposition between utility and natural values is often presented as a peculiarly twentieth-century development, as if colonial Australia had in its desperate struggle to prosper little time for admiration of the natural beauty of the land. Tim...
'The Boy from Bowral': The Role of the Bush in the Legend of Sir Donald Bradman
Sir Donald's supreme mastery of the game of cricket marked a stage in the growth of Australia's nationhood. The 19th century had been full of achievement, from the brave explorers to the innovative pastoralists, from the politicians who fashioned a...
The 'Country' in Contemporary Australian Women's Country Music: Gender, History, Narrative
Australian country music has generally been characterised by two persistent and negative images: as poor cousin to the 'real' country music of North America, and as the musical nostalgia of the reactionary rural classes. Notwithstanding the lack of...
The Terra of Recognition
Since first contact and invasion, Europeans have imagined Australia in two related ways: as terra nullius, and as terra incognita. While Indigenous Australians have always known the fictiveness of these two modes of imagining this country, it took...
When the Imaginary Australian Is Not Uncanny: Nation, Psyche and Belonging in Recent Australian Cultural Criticism and History
In our book Uncanny Australia, Jane Jacobs and I argue that postcolonialism brings both the good news and the bad news; at the same time, we never say that postcolonialism exists outside of the shadow of colonialism. We argue that Australia is postcolonial...