Journal of Comparative Family Studies

A journal emphasizing research concerning cross-cultural families for the academic audience.

Articles from Vol. 39, No. 3, Summer

Editors' Note & Introduction
Three secular processes have shaped the social change of family structures in the 20th century, namely increased material inequality, demographic transition and educational expansion. These processes are largely intertwined and result in specific challenges...
HIV and AIDS: Are All Women Equally at Risk? Afrikaans Speaking Married Women's Perceptions of Self-Risk
INTRODUCTIONLiving in South Africa, one is constantly reminded of the reality of HIV and AIDS. Messages on billboards propagate safe sex; parliamentarians debate AIDS policy on live television; people you know die as a result of the disease. A national...
Homemaker or Career Woman: Life Course Factors and Racial Influences among Middle Class Americans
INTRODUCTIONToday, the principal theory of marriage and its relationship to gender equality is that women's status has improved and inequality between husbands and wives has declined. The explanation is that marriage in traditional society was patriarchal....
The Importance of Social Context in the Formation of the Value of Children for Adolescents: Social Class and Rural Urban Differences in Taiwan
INTRODUCTIONIn recent years, fertility behavior, parenting and elderly support have received increasing attention in family studies. This is largely due to emergent changes in'the population structure, especially the declining birth rates and the prolonged...
The Quest for a Child of One's Own: Parents, Markets and Transnational Adoption
INTRODUCTIONThe global numbers of transnational adoptions have more than doubled recently compared to the situation at the beginning of the 1990s, when researchers believed that the trend would, on the contrary, be a downward one (Altstein & Simon,...
The Significance of Cross-Border Marriage in a Low Fertility Society: Evidence from Taiwan
INTRODUCTIONChinese tradition has viewed the family as the primary societal unit, so that the interests of individuals were generally secondary to those of the family. To extend the family lineage into the future through childbearing, early and universal...
The Sociocultural Adaptation of Polish Brides in the Netherlands: Marital and Occupational Status*
INTRODUCTIONPolish Marriage Immigrants in the NetherlandsPoland for decades has been a traditional donor country of brides for West Europe. During the era of communism, when translational mobility was very restricted in Central and Eastern Europe, for...
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