Journal of Comparative Family Studies

A journal emphasizing research concerning cross-cultural families for the academic audience.

Articles from Vol. 29, No. 2, Summer

A Better Life for Me and My Children: Low-Income Single Mothers' Struggle for Self-Sufficiency in the Rural South
I went through a lot of changes, changes when I first found out I was pregnant . . . then, after [he was born] it was no problem. It was like I knew I had responsibility, a responsibility to carry on for the rest of my life, and I wasn't gonna let anything...
African American Mothers and Grandmothers in Poverty: An Adaptational Perspective
INTRODUCTION Recent demographic studies have documented changes in household and family formation patterns among African Americans. Focusing specifically on low-income families, they have discerned increases in female headship, decreases in marriage,...
Armoring: Learning to Withstand Racial Oppression
Scholarly writing about African American women clearly reveals their perilous social position in society because of the interlocking and interactive forces of race, sex and class (Collins, 1990; Davis, 1981; Dill, 1979; Hooks, 1984; King, 1988). In response...
Black Family Life on Television and the Socialization of the African American Child: Images of Marginality
Sociologists, anthropologists, psychologists and other students of human behavior have generally agreed on the importance of the social and developmental process they refer to as socialization. The socialization process is one by which children learn...
Cancer among Black Families: Diffusion as a Strategy of Prevention and Intervention
INTRODUCTION The Department of Sociology and Anthropology, the Association of Black Sociologists (ABS), and the National Outreach Initiatives Branch (NOIB)joined a cooperative agreement to strengthen and enhance the National Black Leadership Initiatives...
Identity Formation: Problems and Prospects, the Case of Zimbabwe
INTRODUCTION Zimbabwe's adolescents are in cultural transition, forced to adopt occidental behaviors at the expense of their own culture. Identity formation is unpredictable as socialization units themselves move away from the African cultural mosaic...
Male Violence against Men and Women in the Caribbean: The Case of Jamaica
INTRODUCTION: THE STORY OF JAMAICA Last year in Kingston, Jamaica, I interviewed Tula, a woman seeking an abortion. I was very impressed by her. She was a small farmer who with her family planted yams, sweet potatoes and coco, and reared goats and pigs....
Mundane Extreme Environmental Stress and African American Families: A Case for Recognizing Different Realities
INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND One of the most frequently used statements regarding race issues in America is that of W.E.B. Du Bois (1903), who observed that the most pressing problem facing America in the twentieth century is that of the color line. This...
Race, Family Structure and Rural Poverty: An Assessment of Population and Structural Change
The Black family has long been a topic of considerable significance and controversy in American sociology. In contemporary studies, much emphasis has been placed on the significance of family structure in explaining the disproportionate level of poverty...
Rural African Family Structure in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa
African family and household structure in South Africa has not been systematically documented by sociologists. Yet generalizations and assumptions about these families and households, some from as early as fifty years ago, continue to be made today (Russell,...
Social Construction of Ethnicity versus Personal Experience: The Case of Afro-Amerasians
There are two significant contributors to ethnicity or racial group identity: a thread of historical experience that is shared by each member of the collectivity, and a sense of potency/strength inherent in the group (see Phinney, 1990). In social science...
Social Networks and Support: A Comparison of African Americans, Asian Americans, Caucasians, and Hispanics
INTRODUCTION Milardo ( 1988) notes that the relationships we maintain with other individuals, whether close and longstanding or ordinary and brief, are among the most important features of life. Through relationships with these individuals-however superficial-we...
The Family Costs of White Racism: The Case of African American Families
For most people there is a collective memory of the family, one that is revived in the present through contact with others. Insights into this memory, and knowledge of the ways it is transmitted, can unveil the impact of White racism on the family lives...
The Impact of Family Function on Health of African American Elderly
INTRODUCTION The family is the most important social context within which health is maintained, illness occurs and health-related decisions are made. As for all elderly populations, the family is the principal source of social support and has a major...
What's Love Got to Do with It? Economic Viability and the Likelihood of Marriage among African American Men
African American family formation has long been a subject of scholarly as well as lay concern. From the research of W.E.B. Du Bois and Oliver Cox to popular articles in Essence magazine, the African American family has been a focal point of national...
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