Journal of Comparative Family Studies

A journal emphasizing research concerning cross-cultural families for the academic audience.

Articles from Vol. 41, No. 2, Spring

Guest Editors' Note and Introduction
In the past two years, the growing trend of "South-South Migration" has attracted attention from the World Bank, the United Nations, other development policy-makers and practitioners. According to the World Bank, it is estimated that 74 million, or nearly...
Migrant Mothers and Divided Homes: Perceptions of Immigrant Peruvian Women about Motherhood
INTRODUCTION1While migration is a phenomenon characterized by extensive amounts of data world-wide, migratory flows have been adopting new forms in recent decades, in terms of both direction and composition. The direction has shifted from "north-to-south"...
Remittances as a Currency of Care: A Focus on 'Twice Migrants' among the Indian Diaspora in Australia
INTRODUCTION: REMITTANCESRemittances to developing countries have become the focus of increasing attention as they are the largest international flow of money, larger than foreign direct investment and more than double the size of foreign aid (Development...
The Place of Migration in Girls' Imagination
INTRODUCTIONThis paper focuses on rural girls' aspirations of becoming migrants and young women's experiences as migrants in a setting where girls are subjected to social constraints curtailing their movements in the midst of an otherwise mobile society....
Transnational Family Life among Peruvian Migrants in Chile: Multiple Commitments and the Role of Social Remittances
INTRODUCTIONMost of the literature on migration and transnationalism has focused on migration from the South to the North. By focusing on Peruvian migration to Chile, this paper explores some of the characteristics of the social reproduction of transnational...
Transnational Family Ties, Remittance Motives, and Social Death among Congolese Migrants: A Socio-Anthropological Analysis
INTRODUCTIONIn empirical research1 amongst Congolese2 migrants in Johannesburg, the majority of respondents consider remittances as constituting a strain on their livelihoods in host settings and as cause of a major setback to the realization of their...
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