USA TODAY

Founded in September of 1982, USA Today is a national daily newspaper published by Gannett Co., Inc. The paper has a Mon.-Thurs. circulation of over 2 million readers. The Friday edition of the paper has a circulation of over 2.5 million readers.The Editor of USA Today is John Hillkirk.

Articles from Vol. 128, No. 2659, April

10 Mistakes That Can Cost You Money
To avoid mistakes when preparing your income taxes, the Financial Planning Association, Denver, Colo., recommends being careful not to make these 10 errors: 1. Assuming you don't have to pay the AMT. The alternative minimum tax was designed to make...
A Common Currency for North America?
The idea of North America adopting a common currency similar to the Euro may sound far-fetched, but a survey by Coinstar Inc. shows many Americans support it. "The Coinstar National Currency Poll: A Periodic Look at Americans and Their Money" found...
Advice for Job-Hoppers
Once, the hallmark of a good employee was the loyal worker who stayed with the same company for 20 to 30 years. Today, the average worker changes employers every five years, and, thanks to the tight labor market, many think nothing of switching every...
Are Women Responsible for the Glass Ceiling?
Behavioral scientist Shannon L. Goodson argues that women did not create the glass ceiling--the invisible barrier blamed for limiting the career prospects of females--but they help maintain it. Goodson, co-author with George W. Dudley of The Psychology...
Baby Boomers Battle Sports Injuries
Having a sports injury almost has become a rite of passage for many baby boomers. Those individuals are slowly realizing that they cannot always turn back the clock and avoid injury. In fact, many boomers are getting mixed messages that exercise...
Confronting Danger in the Workplace
Preventing workplace violence and creating safe and secure business environments are two of the most important issues facing employers, Kimberly Gee Stith, a labor and employment lawyer from Houston, Tex., told the American Bar Association Tort and...
Consumers Yearn for Better Packaging
Research from The Consumer Network shows that Americans' perceptions of food and beverage packaging have shifted dramatically. Instead of viewing it as a necessary evil, consumers see desirable packages as a reason to purchase, and packages they don't...
Did Benjamin Franklin Invent Infotainment?
Benjamin Franklin, one of our nation's Founding Fathers, also was the founding father of infotainment, that ever-popular blend of information and entertainment, according to Tom Leonard, associate dean of the University of California, Berkeley's North...
Direct Mail Outsells Internet, Say Marketers
Marketing executives at large and mid-sized companies indicate that they allocate nearly four times more of their communications budget to direct mail than Internet promotions. According to the second Pitney Bowes Direct Mail Study, conducted by the...
Empathy Helps People Forgive and Forget
What helps people to treat past hurts with forgiveness? Psychologists who dug into what helps people forgive found that, in close, committed relationships, developing empathy for the person who hurt you makes a difference. With hurt comes a sense...
Helping Venus and Mars Find Harmony
Stylistic differences between the sexes can create challenges in the home, according to a recent survey conducted by the American Furniture Manufacturers Association (AFMA). While Venus and Mars may live peacefully in the same house, finding furnishings...
Mood Fluctuations Can Affect Work
Gauging job satisfaction is like measuring the tidewaters--both can change with the time of day. That's one reason why typical measures--such as surveys and polls --are not very useful, maintains Howard Weiss, professor of psychology, Purdue University,...
Noteworthy
Losing weight, if you're obese, not only will make you look and feel better, says Gerry Oster of Policy Analysis Inc., Brookline, Mass., it will put money in your pocket. An analysis of the health and economic benefits to be gained from losing 10%...
Portion Sizes Growing out of Control
Nutrition experts with the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) are calling for people to take a day to measure the serving sizes of their favorite foods. Making time to "eyeball" individual serving amounts, they maintain, reveals a widening...
Positive Effects of Working Mothers
Mothers who are full-time homemakers are more likely to use either an authoritarian or a permissive parenting style than those who are employed full time, according to psychologist Lois W. Hoffman, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, co-author of Mothers...
Preventive Maintenance for Future Well-Being
Young adults may feel healthy, but, like a new car that is neglected, they are in for often needless trouble in later years, warns Wes Alles, director of Stanford (Calif.) University's Health Improvement Program. The good news is that, with a little...
Putting the Brakes on EMPLOYEE ABSENTEEISM
More workers than ever before am staying homo to combat stress or simply because they feel entitled to a day off, the 1999 CCH Unscheduled Absence Survey by CCH Inc., Riverwoods, III., found. Meanwhile, as workers clearly signal distress, employers...
Putting Your Money Where Your Heart Is
There is a debate that has been around since the 1970s, when socially responsible mutual funds first appeared on the scene. Investing in socially responsible funds or companies sacrifices returns and increases risk because you are automatically eliminating...
Scary Movies and TV Programs Have Long-Lasting Effects
While the short-term effects of watching horror movies or other films and television programs with disturbing content are well-documented among children and teens, a study by researchers Kristen Harrison, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and Joanne...
SCHOOL VOUCHER PROGRAM May Foster Racial Separation
Proponents of school choice maintain that parents would make choices based on school quality and school preferences, not on racial bias. A study by two Temple University, Philadelphia, Penna., researchers challenges that position. Professor of sociology...
Segregated Cities Equal Higher Death Rates
Living in cities with high levels of racial segregation is linked to higher death rates for whites as well as blacks, according to a study by researchers at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and the University of California at Berkeley. They examined...
Shape, Not Color, Helps Babies Tell Objects Apart
Shape seems to be the most important factor in babies' deciphering of the boundaries between two objects, according to a study by Amy Needham, assistant professor of psychology, Duke University, Durham, N.C. She discovered that four-month-olds rely...
Students Lack Needed Study Skills
As educational standards and expectations rise throughout the country, the nation is demanding more than ever from its students. Yet, have Americans equipped their off-spring with the fundamental study skills needed to foster increased academic achievement?...
Suburban Living vs. the Environment
Even though the political climate suggests it is a popular time to complain about suburban sprawl, the suburban lifestyle is what most Americans want--because it suits their values, maintains John Warfield Simpson, associate professor of landscape...
Success Threatens Olympic Games
The Olympic Games are in danger because of their success, maintains Phillip Henson, a professor in the Department of Kinesiology, Indiana University, Bloomington. He has firsthand knowledge of this international event, having served as the track and...
Turning the Tide to Save Oceans
From coastal zones to the high seas, a growing wave of citizen groups, businesses, and governments are mobilizing to save the oceans before human activities destroy them, reports Worldwatch Institute senior researcher Anne Platt McGinn. She cites a...
Water Costs Will Rise as Availability Diminishes
Consumers can expect to pay more for water as the availability of high-quality freshwater becomes a serious issue in the coming decades. "Water will become increasingly precious, and it will become more expensive," predicts Amy Ward, professor of biological...
Wide Disparity in White-Collar Sentences
In the nation's Federal courts, some districts are far more likely to send convicted white-collar criminals to prison than are others, according to statistics gathered from Department of Justice data by the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse,...
Women Becoming More Involved in Car Care
It's no wonder women are taking better care of their vehicles since they buy half of the new cars and trucks in the U.S. That number is expected to climb to 60% in 2000. According to the 1999 NAPA (National Automotive Parts Association) Auto-Attitudes...

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