USA TODAY

USA Today is a monthly magazine published by The Society for the Advancement of Education.

Articles from Vol. 140, No. 2797, October

Aging Brains Similar to Diseased Ones
Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) are two of the most prevalent forms of neurodegenerative disorders. In a study published in Genome Research, scientists have analyzed changes in gene expression in aging and diseased...
Billions of Dollars Lost Each Year
Last flu season resulted in 100,000,000 lost workdays, along with nearly $700,000,000,000 in foregone wages, and 32,000,000 missed school days, according to a survey by Walgreens, Deerfield, III., the largest provider of flu shots outside of the Federal...
Blood Test Can Tip off Smokers
During a regular annual physical exam, blood usually is drawn to check the health of a person's heart, kidneys, and liver. Now, researchers at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center say a blood test that detects the early signs...
Cervical Ripening More Than Accelerates
Cervical ripening that instigates preterm labor is distinct from what happens at the onset of normal term labor, researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, have found. This challenges the conventional premise that premature...
Cooling May Help after Cardiac Arrest
When the heart is stopped and restarted, the patient's life may be saved, but the brain often is damaged permanently. Therapeutic hypothermia, a treatment in which the patients body temperature is lowered and maintained several degrees below normal...
Diabetes Impacts Patients and Spouses
Older patients with diabetes who are dealing well with the disease still are likely to have symptoms of depression, and spouses of older patients also suffer distress related to diabetes and its management, according to research published in Family...
Diagnosis Methods Keep Improving
With October marking the 25th anniversary of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, it should be noted that females with a deleterious gene mutation are being diagnosed with breast cancer almost eight years earlier than relatives of the previous generation...
Doctors Lagging in Automation
The handwriting on your prescription is not the only thing about the typical doctor that is hard to understand. Several recent studies have shown that the vast majority of physicians in the U.S. have not adopted the standardized use of Electronic Health...
Finding Cardiovascular Diseases, Diabetes, Etc
A new type of imaging technology to diagnose cardiovascular disease and other disorders by measuring ultrasound signals from molecules exposed to a fast-pulsing laser has been developed by researchers at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind. The...
Genetic Variation Linked to Sudden Cardiac Arrest
A study by a global consortium of physician-scientists has identified a genetic variation that may predispose people to double the risk of having a sudden cardiac arrest, a disorder that gives little warning and is fetal in about 95% of cases. Although...
Higher Radiation Doses, Fewer Treatments
In a multicenter clinical trial, researchers have found that higher doses of stereotactic radiation therapy requiring fewer treatments are safe and effective for patients with low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Results of the trial, available...
Insulin Dependence to Be Eliminated?
Type 1 diabetes could be converted to an asymptomatic, noninsulin-dependent disorder by eliminating the actions of a specific hormone, suggests research published in Diabetes. The findings demonstrate that insulin can become completely superfluous...
Lack of Symptoms Could Prove Deadly
Nearly 10,000 Americans die each year due to thoracic aortic disease (TAD), a rare condition that affects roughly 15,000 people annually and often goes undiagnosed due to the lack of symptoms. However, more and more research is showing the hereditary...
Memory Loss: Patients Worried, Not So Doctors
Those with epilepsy worry more than their physicians do about the patients' potential memory loss accompanying their seizure disorder, according to a study at Ohio State University, Columbus. In a survey, individuals with epilepsy ranked memory loss...
New App Allows for Self-Testing
A convenient device that lets patients who have a degenerative eye disease better track vision changes has been created with the help of an ophthalmologist at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas. With a handheld digital device...
New Drug Therapy Improves Kidneys
A new anti-inflammatory drug used by individuals with type 2 diabetes improves kidney function, reports a study in the New England Journal of Medicine. This marks the first time a drug therapy has led to better kidney function for patients with type...
Paper Strips Serve as Laboratory
A technique that uses inexpensive paper to make "microfluidic" devices for rapid medical diagnostics and chemical analysis has been invented by researchers at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind. The innovation represents a way to enhance commercially...
Pounded Football Players Sustain Brain Changes
Some high school football players suffer undiagnosed changes in brain function and continue playing even though they are impaired, suggests a study by Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind. "Our key finding is a previously undiscovered category of...
"Quiet" Disease Shows Symptoms Late
Cervical cancer is one of the most common reproductive cancers in females, but women can take steps to reduce their risk of developing it "Many cervical cancer cases could be prevented, or at least caught early, if all women received proper screening...
Secondary Mutations Make Cancer More Lethal
An important step toward a better understanding of prostate cancer has been taken by uncovering evidence that it is not one disease, as previously believed, but rather several factors which can be measured and, in the future, destroyed by targeted...
"Sexy" Costumes Inappropriate for Young Girls
Designing risque and sexualized Halloween costumes for girls has become a lucrative Mm business and parents are concerned that this trend is sending the wrong message to their children. The traditional pirate, witch, and schoolteacher costumes for...
Sit-Ups Do Not Reduce Belly Fat
With all of the gadgets and gizmos available that promise six-pack abs, you might think we should be a nation of strapping Adonises. The current U.S. obesity epidemic would indicate otherwise. Sit-ups and crunches will tighten your abdominal muscles,...
The Food Police Have Arrived: "... When It Comes to Policing the American Diet This Administration Takes the Cake (Quite Literally)."
In many ways, Pres. Barack Obama and his allies in Congress believe they know better than you do what is in your own best interest but when it comes to policing the American diet this Administration takes the cake (quite literally). In an obscure provision...
Three Meals a Day Proves Successful Formula
Eating fewer, regular-sized meals with higher amounts of lean proteins can make one feel more full than ingesting smaller, more frequent meals, according to research at the University of Missouri, Columbia. "We found that when eating high amounts of...
Used Face Shields Susceptible to Breaking
Game-worn football face shields are more susceptible to breaking when subjected to high-velocity impact than are new face shields, according to research from Ohio State University, Columbus. Researchers used an air cannon to hurl baseballs at new and...
Warriors' Angels Brought to Light
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] "Battlefield Surgery 101: From the Civil War to Vietnam." resents the highlights of the evolution of military surgical activities through a selection of photographs and 19th- and 20th-century artifacts--examining how the military...
Water Pipe Epidemic among Young People
Students in schools and universities in the U.S. and around the world are using water pipes to smoke tobacco at "alarmingly high" rates, according to a study by researchers at the University at Buffalo (N.Y). "Water pipe smoking is a real epidemic...
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