USA TODAY

USA Today is a monthly magazine published by The Society for the Advancement of Education.

Articles from Vol. 125, No. 2625, June

Cloud Photos Suggest That Jupiter Is Wet
The Galileo probe that dropped into Jupiter's atmosphere in December, 1995, detected a smaller amount of water than scientists expected. However, researchers at California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, have new thundercloud photographs and a...
Controlling Pests without Chemicals
A survey examining the success of biological control of insects in agriculture concludes that this natural approach to pest containment is far more effective than often appreciated and should be more widely used. Several case studies explored by researchers...
DNA Data Could Spawn "Genetic Underclass." (Paul R. Billings, Chief of Staff at the Clinic of the Veterans Admin. Palo Alto Health Care System, Warns of Discrimination in the Collection and Storage of Genetic data)(Brief Article)
Public policy initiatives and increased physician awareness are needed to maintain a healthy balance between the promise of genetic engineering and the potential for genetic discrimination, maintains Paul R. Billings, deputy chief of staff for the...
Eliminating Engine Knock Increases Operating Efficiency
A new method for detecting engine knock holds promise for more efficient automobiles, according to researchers at Ohio State University, Columbus. As part of an on-board knock-control system, the method could help engines consume gasoline more efficiently...
Eliminating "Junk" Genes
Scientists at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind., have found a way to reduce the guesswork and errors in genetic engineering. It could speed the delivery of biotech-derived crops and possibly even benefit human gene therapy. Thomas K. Hodges,...
Excavating 300-Year-Old French Ship
Excavation of famed French explorer Rene-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle's ship, the Belle, is under way off the Texas coast. The shipwreck site is the first in the hemisphere to use a cofferdam -- a watertight structure designed to keep liquid...
Fiery Foils Produce New Sealing Process
Soldiers in a remote desert must make emergency equipment repairs. They have no welding torch or access to an industrial furnace. Instead. a soldier slips a metallic film. thin as aluminum foil, between the broken parts and touches a match to the...
Hormones Key to Drought Resistance
A team of University of Missouri plant physiologists has discovered how key plant hormones help plants deal with drought. That information will be valuable to plant breeders seeking varieties that will perform well under drought stress. Researcher...
Internet Glitches Slow Smooth Surfing
Anyone who has spent time on the Internet lately has noticed "travel time" occasionally slows down. It might take hours or days to send off a message or an equal amount of time to receive an expected message or file. Some delays are due to massive...
Jovian Moon Has Thin Oxygen Atmosphere
Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have found evidence of a thin oxygen atmosphere on Jupiter's moon Ganymede, the largest of the Jovian satellites. The same team of scientists previously had found a tenuous veil of oxygen around another...
"Little Ice Age" Is on the Way
The so-called Arctic Express, the frigid northern wind that brought record low temperatures to the central United States in December, 1996, could be the harbinger of a "little ice age," predicts Ernest Kung, chairman of the Atmospheric Sciences Department,...
Magnetic Tweezers Move DNA Molecules
Denis Wirtz switches on his magnetic tweezers, grabs hold of a single DNA molecule, and uses a joystick to steer it carefully through a solution. Wirtz. assistant professor of chemical engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md., is not...
New Security System Is Virtually Uncrackable
What may be the greatest advance in security technology since the invention of the padlock has applications for everything from cash, credit cards, and computers to homes, cars, and secret government installations. It also is invisible to the naked...
New Technique Adds Speed and Ease
Researchers at Ohio State University. Columbus, have found a way to shorten a key process used in designing many manufactured products, from car parts to detergent bottles. In the process, called digitizing, a computer scas an object -- a clay prototype...
New Theory of Continent Formation
There are major flaws in conventional beliefs about the process that formed and continues to shape the continents, maintains Bruce Marsh, professor of earth and planetary sciences, Johns Hopkins University. The process in which molten rock, or magma,...
Noses Show Dinosaurs Were Cold-Blooded
The long, sometimes heated debate about whether dinosaurs were warm- or cold-blooded may be about over, a new study suggests. The verdict is that they were cold-blooded, just like most scientists believed all along and modern reptiles are today. Moreover,...
Prosthetic Foot Mimics Real Thing
A prosthetic foot that better mimics how a biological foot works has been developed by Mark R. Pitkin, research assistant professor of bioengineering, Tufts School of Medicine, Boston. Besides helping amputees maintain their balance and stand, walk,...
Seeking to Curtail Formosan Termites
Discoveries by a team of researchers from Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, could lead to control of the Formosan termite. They have identified certain chemical traces that are essential to the insects well-being. By manipulating these chemicals....
Self-Repairing Bacterium Tantalizes Scientists
When it was first discovered in 1956, the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans caused a great stir of interest. The little bug, whose name means "the amazing radiation-enduring berry," can survive 3,000 times the amount of radiation that would be lethal...
Shedding Light on Electron's Structure
An electron may not be exactly what has been thought since its discovery 100 years ago. According to recent measurements by physicists at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind., the tiny particle may not be a simple negative point charge, as scientists...
Speeding Up DNA Identification
Scientists at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas have shown that genetic probes can be modified to accelerate recognition of DNA sequences and increase the strength of their binding. The probes, known as oligonucleotides, are...
Substituting Hot Water for Dangerous Acids
Just as aspirin is a wonder drug, hot water may be a wonder liquid. In research continuing over several years, scientists have found that "a lot of organic chemical reactions that are normally carried out with strong acids or bases can be carried...
Teaching Machines to Recognize Objects
A packaging robot, working in a candy factory in the near future, aims its electronic eye at a tray crammed with chocolates. The robot must fill a box with a specific mix of candy, but how can it tell a cream-filled morsel from a chocolate-covered...
Things Don't Always Become Bigger
Paleontologists have believed for a century that organisms naturally evolved to larger and larger sizes. However, a study by University of Chicago paleontologist David Jablonski shows that this is not true. In fact, there is no more tendency for things...
Top 10 Technological Challenges for the Next Decade
"The bridge to the 21st century is under construction, and the only way we're going to be able to build it quickly and correctly is if we understand the technological challenges ahead of us," says Stephen Millett, manager of Battelle's Breaktrough...
Turtles Misplaced on Reptile Family Tree
Turtles long have been thought to be the most primitive living reptiles. making them an important model for scientists who study reptiles ranging from the extinct dinosaurs to modern-day snakes, lizards, and crocodiles. However, paleontologist Olivier...
X-Ray Telescope Will Provide Sharpest Images
Performing beyond expectations, the high-resolution mirrors for NASA's most powerful orbiting X-ray telescope successfully have completed initial testing at Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Calibration Facility in Huntsville, Ala. "We have the...
"X-Ray Vision" Aids Medical Diagnoses
In 1988, with both interest and concern, Henry Fuchs watched his pregnant wife undergo her first amniocentesis, a medical test for possible abnormalities in their developing baby. He was struck by the apparent awkwardness of the procedure. A University...
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