USA TODAY

USA Today is a monthly magazine published by The Society for the Advancement of Education.

Articles from Vol. 126, No. 2636, May

Ancestors of the Incas: Lost Civilizations of Peru
The largest, most comprehensive exhibition of Peruvian artifacts ever to travel to North america is on display as part of WONDERS: The Memphis (Tenn.) International cultural Series. Spanning 3,000 years of Peruvian prehistory, it includes more than...
Bright Job Picture for Class of '98
There is good news on the job market front for college graduates this year, according to the 27th annual Recruiting Trends survey conducted by Career Services and Placement at Michigan State University, East Lansing. "Employers are predicting a higher...
Children's Sedentary Lifestyle: A Forerunner of Unhealthy Adulthood
The 1996 Surgeon General's Report on Physical Activity and Health provides considerable evidence that regular physical activity dramatically can improve health and quality of life. Among the findings are that physical activity reduces the risks of...
Citizens Are Willing to Make Hard Choices
Ad with all major democracies, the U.S. government is a representative, not a direct, democracy. Elected officials govern according to their perceptions of what their constituents want. Among other factors, politicians rely on public opinion polls...
Cleaner Vacuums
Vacuum cleaners have been a staple in most homes since just after the turn of the century. Various improvements and innovations have been added over more than nine decades, but the implements' function has remained unchanged -- cleaning up dirt. Just...
Combining Business with "Mini Vacations"
When corporate America's troops hit the road with laptop computers and cellular phones, they also may be "packing" their suntan lotion and Frisbees -- and the kids, too. More and more, people are combining pleasure with business when traveling...
Confronting the Spectre of Declining Opportunity
"Stagnating incomes and increasing earnings inequality have reconfigured the economic landscape for tens of millions -- particularly younger Americans." America always has called itself "the land of opportunity." Reality never quite has matched the...
Controlling Economic Competition in the Pacific Rim
The Big Three economic powers in Asia -- China, Japan, and the U.S. -- must learn to cooperate economically, politically, and militarily if prosperity is to succeed in this burgeoning marketplace. As astonished tenders and investors surveyed the...
Corruption and Crisis in the Global Economy
There has been considerable hand-wringing and argument in recent months about whether the Asian financial crisis caught American economists and the stock market unaware and, if so, how this could have happened. John Naisbitt, author of Megatrends...
Dirty Secrets of Renewable Energy
One of the centerpieces of the environmentalist agenda long has been the regulation of fossil-fuel consumption, Although anti-pollution controls are the accepted short-term solution to a number of the environmental problems posed by fossil fuels,...
Extramarital Affairs Are Not So Common
Married couples may not be fooling around with other partners as frequently as some people think, Michael Wiederman, a psychological sciences professor at Ball State University, Muncie, Ind., says. A national survey of 2,000 married men and women...
Heathenization of Christianity in African Society
African Society is unique, characterized by a family relationship in which each member sees himself or herself as bound up inextricably with the customs and practices of the tribe and his or her ancestors. Since this kind of affinity is the result...
Is the Rising Tide Lifting All Boats?
The class warfare lobby is singing its "soak the rich" anthem again. For example, a recently released report by the liberal Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP) suggests that "income disparities between the top fifth of families with children...
Network News Shows: Omitting Important Economic Facts
Americans are not being informed that the wealthy pay most of the Federal income taxes; that free enterprise can save the environment; that domestic social spending continues to soar; that Social Security will bankrupt future generations; and that government...
Preventing Violence: From Tragedy to Solutions
When 20-year-old Nancy Spungen was stabbed to death by British punk-rocker Sid Vicious in a New York hotel room in 1978, few people could have imagined the profound effects her murder would have on her family. No one could have predicted how that...
Saving Our Nation's Most Precious Resources: Our Children
Too many of America's children have been neglected, abused, and ignored. Without change, the dark spectre of generational warfare predicted by some could become all too real. If that deadly conflict occurs, it will be because no one pays attention...
Sexual Morality among the High and Mighty
Most people usually lead a fairly moral life with respect to sexual matters such as adultery and fornication. They may stray, but, for the most part, not often. They expect their leaders and famous people to do the same, but, in this, they are disappointed....
Sling Blade
The crisis within the nuclear family has been something of an obsession in the Hollywood cinema of the last 25 years as the aftermath of Vietnam and Watergate punctured the ultimate symbol of American community. Films such as "Ordinary People" (1980)...
Stanley Cup vs. Olympic Gold
After the Czech Republic won the gold medal in hockey by defeating the hated Russians at the 1998 Winter Olympics, thousands upon thousands of delirious revelers jammed Old Town Square in Prague. This even outnumbered the multitude who celebrated...
Stifling Competition in the Supercomputer Industry
On May 17, 1996, the U.S. government flirted with history. For the first time, a Federally funded agency decided to buy a supercomputer made by a non-U.S. company. An agency of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) in Boulder,...
The Changing Face of New York
Berenice Abbott was born in Springfield, Ohio, in 1898. At age 19, she left home and headed to New York's bohemian mecca, Greenwich Village. In 1921, the aspiring sculptor joined the post-World War I exodus of American artists to Paris, where she...
The Electoral College Is a Ticking Time Bomb
Now that the U.S. has won the Cold War, achieved economic prosperity, gotten crime under control, and balanced the budget, maybe we can tackle a really tough problem. The time has come to straighten out the Electoral College -- that archaic anti-democratic...
The Government's Crusade against Tobacco: Can It Ultimately Succeed?
Based on past performance, medical warnings, high excise taxes on cigarettes, and anti-tobacco media campaigns will have no long-term effect on smoking. Federal, state, and local governments Fare crusading against tobacco. The charge is being...
The Ice Storm
The crisis within the nuclear family has been something of an obsession in the Hollywood cinema of the last 25 years as the aftermath of Vietnam and Watergate punctured the ultimate symbol of American community. Films such as "Ordinary People" (1980)...
The Insanity Defense: Unconscionable Impact on Victims of Violence
The September 1997 issue of The Atlantic Monthly has an unusually detailed and poignant cover story titled "A Grief Like No Other." The lengthy piece (almost 29 pages) by Eric Schlosser, winner of the 1995 National Magazine Award for reporting, describes...
The Sweet Hereafter
The crisis within the nuclear family has been something of an obsession in the Hollywood cinema of the last 25 years as the aftermath of Vietnam and Watergate punctured the ultimate symbol of American community. Films such as "Ordinary People" (1980)...
The U.S. Is Becoming a Nanny State
"In crusade after crusade -- whether -- it is against tobacco, DDT, ethnic food, alcohol, or whatever product the self-appointed national nannies disapprove of -- facts are not important. Once a target has been chosen, all that matters to them is the...
Those Annoying Media Pundits
It's getting harder and harder to find straight factual accounts of what is going on in the world today. Reporters and editors in all media long ago decided that it is their obligation not just to report the facts, but to interpret them. Reporters...
Who Should Kids Live with in Single-Parent Homes?
Results from a nationwide study cast doubt on the common belief that children in single-parent households are better off living with their same-sex parent. The research revealed no evidence that a same-sex advantage shows up shortly after a family...
Why Do At-Risk Students Thrive in Catholic Schools?
Strong institutional leadership, shared values among the staff about school goals, a safe and orderly environment, and high expectations for students regardless of back ground provide a climate for learning and much-needed discipline. It is said...
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