USA TODAY

USA Today is a monthly magazine published by The Society for the Advancement of Education.

Articles from Vol. 122, No. 2581, October

Alleviating Soccer Players' Woes
Poorly designed shoes and inefficient training methods may cause bony abnormalities in soccer players' feet and ankles, according to a study of members of the U.S. Men's Senior National and Olympic Soccer Teams. "Players' feet and ankles are exposed...
Bridging Gaps
Gaps between front teeth do not have to be permanent. There are several remedies, suggests Frank Miranda, assistant dean for clinical affairs and professor of operative dentistry, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center College of Dentistry....
Cataract Removal Improves Life
Many of the common progressive symptoms associated with aging--such as mental decline, memory loss, and lack of interest in activities--can be reversed by removal of cloudy cataracts. A nationwide study, compiled at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene...
Computer Makes "House Calls." (Patient Monitoring System)
An automated system that allows doctors to make "house calls" to check on patients' progress, developed at Purdue University, may help keep a lid on costs by allowing physicians and other health care professionals to monitor them without prolonging...
Does Your Baby Need a Diet?
While it is true that chubby babies often grow up to be chubby adults, that doesn't necessarily mean parents should be feeding infants skim milk. In fact, between one and two years of age, children need the fat and calories of whole milk to meet their...
Environment Major Factor in Growth
If you volunteer to colonize the moon or Mars, you can expect your kids born there to look different and move quite differently than you do by the time they start kindergarten. Then, if you plan to send them to boarding school on Earth, you may need...
Exercise Helps Put off the Inevitable
The speed with which people age is affected significantly by whether or not they continue to be physically active throughout their lives, notes Charles Davie, an instructor in the University of Oklahoma Adult Fitness Program. "With disuse, we allow...
Fat Injections - a Risky Procedure
The American Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons (ASPRS) strongly condemns the use of fat injections for breast enlargement, warning that the procedure may hamper the detection of early breast cancer or result in a false-positive cancer...
Foods Can Cause - or Resist - Cancer
Some foods can cause cancer, others can prevent it, but no one knows why. "So the bottom line or selecting what you eat is, as usual, variety and moderation," indicates University of Missouri-Columbia food scientist Robert Marshall. Although a number...
Incontinence Is Controllable
Approximately 12,000,000 American adults experience some form of incontinence, the loss of the ability to control urination. Many of these individuals are reluctant to discuss their condition with anyone, including their physician. "Of these who are...
Many Things Old Are New Again
While CAT scans, MRIs, and other high-tech advances permeate the jargon of modern medicine, many of the standard "die-hard" practices such as house calls and pulse taking--along with the general practice family physician--continue to prosper, indicates...
Men and Women React Differently
Although the inability to have a child often is devastating to both partners, men and women have different reactions to infertility, according to Su Phipps, assistant professor of nursing, University of Oklahoma College of Nursing. She coordinated...
New Compound Aids Imaging Machines
Unique chemical compounds called perfluorocarbons (PFCs) show an impressive assortment of potential life-saving applications. They are carving niches as contrast fluids for diagnosing disease with computerized imaging machines, perfusing the heart...
No Help for Women's Heart Capacity
Older women's heart function--or pumping capacity--does not improve like that of older men after exercise training, according to investigators at the Washington University School of Medicine. They studied 10 sedentary, but healthy, females aged 60-70...
Overprotectiveness Should Be Avoided
In the children's classic Heidi, Klara Sessemann, confined to a wheelchair and overprotected by her father, was virtually helpless until a visit to her friend in the Alps, during which she was encouraged to care for herself. in two weeks, she learned...
Painkillers May Make Headaches Worse
Strong evidence suggests that people with chronic headaches actually are doing themselves more harm than good by taking too many prescription or over-the-counter painkillers. According to researchers at St. Louis University School of Medicine, analgesics-aspirin,...
Programmable Aids Improve Hearing
Digitally programmable aids may be the next frontier n hearing technology, suggests Michael Valente, director of adult audiology and assistant professor of otolaryngology, Washington University School of Medicine. Many adapt to the listening environment...
Soft Bedding Can Make Cribs Deadly
An estimated 7-9,000 infants mysteriously will die in their cribs this year. The fatalities will be attributed to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), but researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine indicate that some of those children...
The Great American "Sleep Debt." (Insomnia)
Forty million Americans suffer chronic sleep disorders, and an additional 20-30,000,000 experience intermittent problems due to lifestyle factors. According to the National Commission on Sleep Disorders Research, total average nightly sleep lime has...
Tips for Coping with Chronic Agony
In addition to its toll on the body, unrelenting pain has a devastating effect on the emotions, typically producing a flood of anxiety, depression, and anger. As physicians become more aware of the interplay between mind and body, they are prescribing...
Treating Vertigo by Surgery
A surgical technique on one of the inner ear balance canals is relieving severe, long-standing positional vertigo in patients at the Ochsner Medical Institutions, New Orleans. During an office exam, the individual is moved to his or her back and placed...
What Can Be Done about Acne?
Acne is a condition affecting the sebaceous glands located deep in the skin of the face, neck, chest, and back. A tiny tube carries oil in the skin surface, where the tube becomes a pore. During adolescence, under the influence of the testosterone...
When Clot-Busting Drugs Aren't Working
Researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine have developed blood tests that provide a quicker, safer way to identify heart attack patients who are not responding to clot-busting drugs. They reliably identify individuals who will need...
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.