USA TODAY

USA Today is a monthly magazine published by The Society for the Advancement of Education.

Articles from Vol. 123, No. 2601, June

Ancient Tin Mine Found in Turkey
Researchers have found a local Bronze Age source of tin in the Middle East. a discovery proving the metal that made the alloy possible was not imported entirely from regions outside the area as had been thought, Aslihan Yener, a University of Chicago...
Bleaching Paper without Chlorine
A new process for making white paper without chlorine has been developed by Craig Hill of Emory University in collaboration with the Forest Products Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Forest Service. It substitutes polyoxometalate (POM)...
Cooling Bubbles Dissipate Heat
Purdue University researches are hot on the trail of a cooling technology that dissipates enormous amounts of heat. It could be used in the design of future fusion reactors, to produce more efficient medical equipment, and to make smaller, lighter electronics....
Digital Satellite Systems vs. Cable
About 15 years ago, big satellite dishes started sprouting in backyards across America. That market didn't take off because of costs and the cable television industry's lock on programming. Now, those big, old satellite dishes are being supplanted by...
End of Cold War Cuts Technological Advances
There was a silver lining to the Cold War: The free world got cheaper and better products as a result of U.S. taxpayer support of research into technologies that might be used to fight the "Evil Empire." Now that the war is over, American economic competitiveness...
Finding a Cure for Potato Blight
A team of Purdue University researchers successfully has engineered a potato that is resistant to late blight disease, the infestation that caused the catastrophic Irish potato famine of 1845. It may seem like the breakthrough is coming 150 years too...
"Fingerprinting" Saves Metallic Equipment
Over the past decade, scientists have developed techniques to fingerprint everything from DNA found in blood at crime scenes to magnetic particles in credit cards. Now, chemical engineers at Washington University have discovered a method to fingerprint...
How to Cope with Cyberphobia
Cyberspace, suite packages, virtual reality, the Internet - if what you feel after reading these terms is something along the lines of mild unease or even full-blown intimidation, you may be a victim of "cyberphobia." According to Andrew Denka, executive...
Lack of Imagination Can Stifle Progress
Those who believe they know how the information highway or other new technologies will shape the future should review a little history, maintains Nathan Rosenberg, an economist of technological change at Stanford University. Those who witnessed the birth...
Learning How to Grow New Limbs
Growing new limbs to replace lost ones sounds like something created by Hollywood special effects wizards for science fiction movies, In the real world, humans can't grow new limbs, but some animals can. Fishermen who sell stone crabs' claws know that...
Luxury Cruising Enters Computer Age
A century ago, designers drew blueprints with drafting pencils; ship's officers noted their vessel's position with hand-held sextants; and chief engineers listened to their engines for an audible sign that all was running smoothly. Computers have changed...
Making Aluminum Car Parts a Reality
Resurrecting dismissed technology of the 1950s and 1960s, an Ohio State University researcher can form car parts out of sheet metal that stretches up to five times more than metal formed using standard molding techniques. The advance promises to make...
Monkey Skull Key to Evolutionary Puzzle
The oldest known and most complete skull of an extinct South American monkey has been discovered high in the Andes Mountains of Chile. The find provides a missing piece in the puzzle of evolution and clues to what the environment was like in South America...
Natural Sunlight Can Purify Water
At a time when water disinfection with chlorine is under attack because of potential health and ecological concerns, an environmentally friendlier way of cleansing drinking water may be on the horizon. The method, solar-assisted water disinfection, takes...
New Roofs to Withstand Harsh Weather
Tornadoes, hurricanes, and extreme temperatures are among the harsh conditions that roofs must withstand. Manufacturers who design new roofing materials want to predict how well they will weather such conditions without testing them for years on top...
Precision Farming Offers Future Savings
Precision farming, also known as prescription or site-specific farming, will be the most economical method in the 21st century, Purdue University experts predict. Right now, though, the technology isn't profitable, indicates James Lowenberg-DeBoer, associate...
Predicting Structural Reliability
A new method for predicting how well materials used in aircraft. automobiles, turbines, and other machines will hold up under heavy strain without developing dangerous structural cracks has been developed at Ohio State University. The aim is to help...
Satellite Technology Runs Equipment
Construction firms soon may be able to use satellite-based technology developed at Ohio State University to help save time and money when surveying and preparing building sites. Researchers have developed software that works with the Global Positioning...
Scrubbing Bubbles Clean Up Soil
Super-tiny bubbles made from an ingredient commonly found in shampoos and soaps are highly effective in cleaning up hazardous wastes in soils. Louisiana State University engineers report. "Look on the label of your shampoo bottle and you'll find the...
Solving Molecular and Biological Problems
In 1590, Dutch optician Zacharias Janssen opened new worlds when he created the first compound microscope. The innovation enabled scientists to view many tiny objects for the first time and ultimately led to advances in medicine, biology, and criminology....
Stop America from Crumbling
Pick up any newspaper and you can read about the U.S.'s crumbling infrastructure and about the increasingly threatened environment. Although these issues may seem unrelated, composite materials research is addressing both concerns. Composites are materials...
Treating Ailments of Aging Aircraft
They are common complaints of getting old - fatigue, stiff joints, cracked skin, and damaged body parts in need of repair. Growing old can be just as debilitating for aircraft as it is for people, so Purdue University researchers are taking a holistic...
Videoconferencing Comes of Age
For some, the vision was born in New York in 1964 at AT&T's World's Fair Pavilion. For many more, it began in the late 1960s with "Star Trek." For a few, it started with the TV cartoon "The Jetsons" in the early 1960s. However it began, the concept...
Virus Origin's "Missing Link."(discovery of Primitive Form That May Link RNA-Based and DNA-Based Life Forms)
Researchers at Ohio State University have found what appears to be the "missing link" connecting the ancient world of virus-like RNAs and other primitive entities to retroviruses and the modern world of Dna-based creatures. The discovery provides new...
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.