USA TODAY

Founded in September of 1982, USA Today is a national daily newspaper published by Gannett Co., Inc. The paper has a Mon.-Thurs. circulation of over 2 million readers. The Friday edition of the paper has a circulation of over 2.5 million readers.The Editor of USA Today is John Hillkirk.

Articles from Vol. 125, No. 2615, August

Businessmen Demand Better Service
Are a decent meal and comfortable seat on an airplane too much to ask for? If they are, baby boomers who dominate business travel today may seek alternatives to travel, rather than endure the discomfort and hassle of flying, according to results from...
Campaign Styles Are Changing
Male and female campaign styles aren't as different as they were in the early 1970s, when women first began running for major political office, maintains David Procter, head of Kansas State University's Speech Department. "Political campaigning has...
Central U.S. Risk Higher Than Thought
University of Illinois geologist Stephen Marshak is not saying that disaster is coming, but he warns that earthquake risk in some of the nation's midsection may have gone unnoticed. More than 1,000,000,000 years ago, extensive regions of the midcontinent...
Church Activists Tackle Social Problems
In October, 1995, 2,000 angry citizens packed a hotel ballroom in San Jose, Calif., to proclaim their discontent with an education system that runs their children through the grades without teaching them the skills needed to land a job. According to...
College Guarantees Four-Year Graduation
A four-year graduation guarantee contract has been made available to entering Virginia Wesleyan College freshmen, beginning with fall, 1996. It guarantees that all undergraduate students wishing to graduate in four years will be provided necessary...
Consumers Shrug off Designer Food Dangers
Contrary to popular lore, the public is not particularly concerned about eating foods tailored through biotechnology, notes Thomas Hoban, professor of sociology and food science, North Carolina State University in Raleigh. In some instances, reaction...
Covering Elections like a Horse Race
As if they were calling a horse race, election season pollsters and pundits provide their daily insight as to which candidate is out front, who is trailing the pack, and who is stumbling. Critics of such journalistic practice say that the coverage...
Directors Must Update Operating Procedures
Ineffective governance by a corporation's board of directors may lead to sagging stock prices and financial malaise for the company. Yet, many corporate boardrooms still function the way they did 20 to 50 years ago, University of Illinois researchers...
Ethics Regulations Fail to Do the Job
From Whitewater to Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich's book deal, Washington seems awash in scandals, yet government ethics regulations are so explicit that they spell out whether employees can accept a sandwich, cup of coffee, or glass of wine. With...
How Effective Is Democracy?
A national survey conducted by Brown University for the Providence Journal-Bulletin found that a majority of people question the effectiveness of American democracy and nearly half believe, in the words of Iran-Contra figure and talk-radio host Oliver...
Improvement Needed in Children's Well-Being
The Center for Families and the Cooperative Extension Service at Purdue University have compiled 10 data "snapshots" that give a dark picture of how children are being treated in America. "People assume that our nation is the world's leader in everything,...
Lie Detectors Could Curb Police Perjury
Los Angeles Police Department detective Mark Fuhrman's testimony in the O.J. Simpson trial under scores the seriousness of police perjury in the U.S. legal system, states Donald Dripps, a University of Illinois law professor. Although no one knows...
Mandatory Drug Testing Violates Rights
Mandatory drug testing for students, teachers, and other school employees contains serious pitfalls. In some cases, it may violate personal rights guaranteed in the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution, maintains Bob Shoop, professor of educational...
Many Single Women Prefer Married Men
The number of relationships between married men and single women has increased greatly over the past decade and appears to be on the rise, notes Victoria L. Rayner, a business consultant and author of The Survival Guide for Today's Career Woman. "The...
Media Underplay Technology Hazards
The public commonly feels that the news media distort and exaggerate the perils of modern technology. However, research indicates that major newspapers, at least, do a fair job of covering oil spills, nuclear accidents, and airplane crashes. "The...
Retirement Crises Looms
Many of today's retirees are finding it difficult to make ends meet, and the future looks even bleaker. Economic, demographic, and regulatory trends suggest that a growing number of tomorrow's retirees will not receive adequate income and/or medical...
Riding the Global Wave to International Success
Companies that do not develop an account management strategy for customers doing business internationally will experience the "global wave" crashing over them in the next few years, warns Howard Katzen, vice president, Major Accounts Marketing, Xerox...
Seagoing Sensor Sends Climate Data
One of the most elusive pieces of the climate and weather puzzle soon may be made available by a simple oceangoing package of sensors the size and shape of a Frisbee. While scientists long have known that climate and weather in large measure are driven...
Should Candidates Disclose Their Health Histories?
Federal law should require all presidential candidates to disclose the complete medical histories maintains Stephen G. Bloom, professor of journalism, University of Iowa. "Voters today know more about what's in a candidate's account than what's in...
Talk Radio Audience Shows Little Growth
While much has been reported on the growing popularity of talk radio, the size of its audience has remained largely unchanged over the last three years, according to a University of Michigan study. Using data from 13 Times Mirror Center polls since...
Teachers Call for More Order
Restoring order in public schools is a top priority of the nation's teachers, according to a study, Given the Circumstances: Teachers Talk About Public Education Today and the general public agrees. Both support similar solutions, including school...
What Women Can Do about Workplace Rights Violations
Women still are battling employers over equal pay for equal work, despite mandates of recent decades, according to Victoria L. Rayner, author of The Survival Guide for Today's Career Woman. "As women strive to achieve equality in the workplace, the...
What You Can Do to Lower Fees
Banks have been raising fees or instituting new ones for several years. Over a four-year period, fees on checking and savings accounts rose 50%. What can you do to lower such charges? The Institute of Certified Financial Planners recommends: Pay...
Who Is Sabotaging School Reform?
What's wrong with America's schools? The answer, according to Temple University adolescent psychologist Laurence Steinberg, author of Beyond the Classroom: Why School Reform Has Failed and What Parents Need to Do, lies with disinterested parents who...
World Is Pessimistic about 21st Century
All around the world, people envision significant changes by the year 2000. Most believe they will be for the worse, according to a global study coordinated by Roper Starch Worldwide and conducted by its International Research Associates affiliates....
Youths Not Convinced by Anti-Violence Ads
Cable television's anti-violence public service announcements frequently fail because many adolescent viewers see them as being delivered by hypocritical, violence-prone spokespersons. They also think the announcements offer unrealistic or no solutions...

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