USA TODAY

USA Today is a monthly magazine published by The Society for the Advancement of Education.

Articles from Vol. 121, No. 2573, February

ABCs of Antidepressants
People taking Prozac or similar antidepressant drugs should know "the rules of the game" when it comes to using such medications properly, cautions Lawrence Cohen, a pharmacy professor at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. In order...
A Hair-Raising Tale
There are many remedies, potions, and promises for combating baldness, but little in the way of genuinely satisfying results. Even the "miracle" of hair transplantation offers only limited aesthetic appeal, with results often marked by scarring, a...
A Problem That Just Won't Go Away
Warts do not come from handling frogs or toads, but are caused by a virus and always have been considered benign, notes Dennis Weigand, vice chairman of the Department of Dermatology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. "However, some [that...
Assessing Need for Repeated Biopsies
Researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine have developed a formula designed to boost the diagnostic power of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test, the most sensitive screening tool available for prostate cancer. The PSA...
Cancer Patients Being Undertreated
Despite the fact that sufficient knowledge about cancer pain management exists, thousands of patients suffer needlessly every year due to misconceptions and misunderstandings that lead to undertreatment, maintains Charles S. Cleeland, a neurology professor...
Can Nerve Cells Regenerate?
Deep inside the inner ear are tiny structures known as hair cells. The exposed part of these sensory cells are hair-like offshoots called cilia, which are surrounded by liquid within the balance organs of the inner ear and send a signal to the brain...
Ceramic Implants as Sturdy as Metal
People missing teeth may soon find a better alternative to the artificial implants now on the market. A new type that utilizes some ceramic components is as reliable as the traditional ones with all-metal parts and is more aesthetically acceptable,...
Clearing Up Mouth Misconceptions
Many myths persist concerning taking care of one's teeth. In an attempt to put to rest some of those misconceptions, faculty members in the College of Dentistry, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, offer the following: It doesn't make...
Deadly Search for Beautiful Bodies
The greatest abuse of anabolic steroids is not by competitive athletes, but in youths who take them for cosmetic reasons to develop a muscular physique. "A recent study suggests that 250,000 to 500,000 high school male seniors under the age of 18 have...
Destroying Tumors in the Brain
A technique that destroys inoperable tumors or malformations in the brain is being used by physicians at the Ochsner Medical Institutions, New Orleans. Stereotactic radiosurgery utilizes small directed beams of radiation to treat areas that may be...
Get a Grip on Common Injuries
Tiny paper cuts sting unmercifully. Arthritis-stricken fingers throb. Nerves damaged by carpal tunnel syndrome tingle as though on fire. It seems as if hand problems hurt more than injuries to other parts of the body. This feeling isn't imaginary,...
Healthy Eating with Dairy Foods
Eating a balanced diet is essential to staying healthy. If you are concerned about hypertension, health experts recommend some important dietary modifications. For years, they have suggested maintaining an ideal weight, reducing sodium intake, and...
Heart May Not Be the Culprit
A crushing, cramping sensation in the chest and upper arm usually is attributed to heart attack or angina. However, that type of feeling also can come from esophageal or gall bladder inflammation, indicating that these organs--as well as the heart--should...
Helping Elderly Cope with Hip Fractures
"Many elderly patients who break a hip face a broad array of problems that transcend the treatment of the injury itself," points out Thomas P. Sculco, a clinical professor in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Cornell University Medical College...
Minerals Can Lower High Blood Pressure
A report released by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) reaffirms the importance of diet in the prevention and treatment of high blood pressure and points to promising new areas of nutrition research that can make a difference for...
New Device Cuts Down on Noise
Snoring loudly affects up to 30% of the U.S. population, especially older men. The condition becomes so severe in about 30% of snorers that obstructive sleep apnea syndrome may develop. Symptoms include excessive daytime sleepiness, fatigue, forgetfulness,...
No "Magic Bullet" for Building Muscle
Routine screening of athletes for anabolic steroid use has led some to seek untraceable substitutes. That search has drawn many to human growth hormone. Produced in the pituitary glands, it is responsible for spurring growth in muscles, bone, and connective...
Ozone Depletion: Cause for Caution, Not Alarm
While studies have associated ultraviolet-B light exposure with the formation of cataracts, it will take decades to determine whether changes in the ozone layer, which predominantly blocks UV-B from the Earth's surface, will have a measurable effect...
Pain or No Pain - a Mother's Decision
Once viewed as "a woman's lot," experiencing pain during childbirth has become a personal choice. For the 1990s, most seem to have decided that "Pain is out," according to Warren Crosby, professor of obstetrics and gynecology, University of Oklahoma...
Preventing Adhesions Following Surgery
Appendectomy patients generally dread the walk they must take the day after surgery to keep things from "growing together." A new substance being tested by University of Texas at Austin researchers could make such painful exercises unnecessary. ...
Preventing Graft Rejection
Damaged human veins and arteries can be repaired with synthetic fabrics, but medical researchers never have solved the problem of rejection caused by clotting or scarring. A new substance being tested at The University of Texas at Austin, however,...
Preventive Surgery for High-Risk Women
Having breast tissue removed before cancer is detected sounds drastic. However, for high-risk women who have watched mothers, sisters, aunts, and other close relatives lose their lives to the disease, the procedure may start as a radical notion, but...
Protecting Kids' Skin during Winter
An unusually cold, harsh winter could be rough on everything from heating bills to car batteries. Imagine what it can do to a child's skin. Gary Williams, a pediatrician at University of Wisconsin Children's Hospital, cautions that "the combination...
Protective Proteins - Bodyguards at Work
As the immune system patrols the body for biological troublemakers, it regularly strikes out at normal, healthy cells as well. Cells rely on special protective proteins to avoid being the victims of this friendly fire. Two of these tiny bodyguards--called...
Stopping Pain of Tendinitis
Tendons are fibrous bands of tissue that connect muscles to bones. Without them, muscles could not do their job of moving different parts of the body. They transmit the power of the muscle contraction to just the right spot on a bone so that the muscle...
Stop Sneezing and Sniffling
Approximately 50,000,000 Americans suffer from itchy and inflamed nasal passages caused by allergic rhinitis. For many, these symptoms often are compounded by difficulty in breathing, headache, and heightened fatigue. Allergies and the common cold...
Syndrome Rarer Than Reports Claim
Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) may be in the news more than in the general population. Hyped as the epidemic of the 1990s, it results in debilitating fatigue and neuromuscular and neuropsychological symptoms. The syndrome is said to occur more frequently...
"Tannable" Silicone for Artificial Parts
If Henry LaFuente has his way, people who wear a prosthetic device--whether an arm, leg, ear, or nose--soon will be able to feel more comfortable wearing their prosthesis in public. LaFuente, adjunct clinical instructor of ocular prosthesis, University...
Testing for Deadly Bacteria
Most food poisoning is unpleasant, but some types are life-threatening. Consumption of food contaminated with the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes can cause a fatal illness--listeriosis. In the U.S., there are 1,850 cases and 460 deaths per year. ...
Testing Is Key to Early Detection
Lack of knowledge, according to the Centers for Disease Control, can kill--especially when it comes to colorectal cancer (CRC). With approximately 160,000 new cases and 60,000 deaths each year, CRC ranks second to lung cancer in causing cancer fatalities....
Tiny Video Camera Aids Hand Surgery
Workers who depend on their hands for their livelihood--such as typists, factory employees, and repair technicians--sometimes may find themselves facing a debilitating pain that prevents them from completing even simple tasks. Although plastic surgery...
When Should Surgery Be Used?
Over the last two decades, orthopedists have made great strides in establishing nonsurgical treatment for low back pain, a condition affecting almost 80% of Americans at some point in their lives, indicates Edward N. Hanley, Jr., chairman of the Department...
Why Diseases Spread
Every year, cases of the cold and flu seem to spread widely across the U.S. During the 1940s and 1950s, for example, polio was a national epidemic. Just how do diseases spread so rapidly? According to Stan Silberg, an epidemiologist at the University...
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