USA TODAY

USA Today is a monthly magazine published by The Society for the Advancement of Education.

Articles from Vol. 123, No. 2591, August

Catalog Overload Turns off Customers
"Too much is never enough" is bad marketing advice where catalogs are concerned, according to Richard Feinberg, head of Purdue University's Department of Consumer Sciences and Retailing. His study found that the more catalogs a consumer gets, the less...
Change Now or Go Belly Up
The Social Security system will have to undergo dramatic changes within the next 10 years if it's going to survive into the 21st century, Robert Myers, former chief actuary of the U.S. Social Security Administration, believes the system "will outlive...
Complacency Foils Future Success
Small business owners and managers may tend to get complacent with their success once their business has survived awhile. A study of nearly 900 companies with an average of eight employees found that older firms were less likely to use and update business...
Congressmen Opt for Private Schools
Forty-four percent of U.S. senators and 30% of representatives send their children to private schools, despite widespread opposition in Congress lo extending the same school choice to the rest of the American public, a Heritage Foundation survey discovered....
Deferred Income Can Fund Retirement
If you're a high-income business owner or executive or even a well-paid middle manager, you may have a more difficult time saving for retirement. A little-publicized, but significant, change in the tax act lowered the maximum mount of compensation...
Dieting Is Fruitless
For most people, dieting in an effort to lose weight is almost as fruitless as trying to hold your breath to stop breathing. "We can do both for a [while] but in the long run, biology wins out over willpower every time," indicates R. Paul Abernathy,...
Grades Aren't the Only Factor
A common dilemma for college-bound high school students is whether they should take the easier math course and get an A or calculus and risk getting a B or even a C on their transcripts, If they seek admission to highly selective schools, admissions...
How to Boost Interest in Science
Television and comic books teach children more science than they are given credit for, according to a survey by Purdue University. More than 30,000 students in Indiana and the Chicago area were asked who is most influential in their lives in promoting...
Important Advice for Parents
A study conducted by the Families and Work Institute, New York, showed that, when it came to child care provided by relatives, 28% of the mothers said they were so dissatisfied with their family child care situation, they would use another option if...
Is There a Future for Temporary Help?
For small companies or seasonal businesses, the hiring of full-time employees can make poor business sense. When extra personnel is needed, many firms rely on a temporary or part-time labor force. While American business has embraced the value of the...
Man-Made Wetlands Aid Waste Disposal
In 1991, manure runoff from a dairy farm dumped nitrogen and phosphates into Appleman Lake, a popular local fishing site in LaGrange County, Ind. The extra nutrients in the runoff allowed aquatic plants in the lake to thrive so much that they threatened...
Military Education Must Be Overhauled
Robert H. Atwell, president of the American Council on Education, has called on the U.S. military to overhaul its education system. Doing so, he maintains, will ensure that it can continue to attract qualified service members in a competitive recruiting...
Reducing the Financial Impact of Moving
Moving is one of the more stressful events of life, often requiring the need to deal with a new job, new home, new town, new school, and new friends. It also can be financially stressful. Some of the monetary impact is readily obvious--the cost...
Restoring the Bloom to the Rose
In a society actively seeking continual excitement and instant gratification, the benefits of long-term relationships frequently are obscured. Married couples often experience the so-called "seven-year itch," but that restlessness can return at 20,...
Say Goodbye to Three Meals a Day
Three meals a day used to be the standard eating pattern for Americans, but the rule likely will be five meals per day soon, according to Christopher Wolf, publisher of The Food Channel. The traditional three-square-meals-a-day regimen already is going...
Serial Killers Grip Americans' Imagination
The serial killer has a death grip on the American imagination, way out of proportion to reality, according to Pennsylvania State University criminologist Philip Jenkins, author of Using Murder: The Social Construction of Serial Homicide. "The phenomenon...
Sibling Rivalry Is Perfectly Normal
Who has not watched kittens, puppies, and other small animals "play fight" among themselves? Most people don't think twice about such an obviously natural stage of development. When that scenario is transferred to young humans, though, a majority of...
Significant Gains for School Choice
The push for education reforms that would allow parents to send their children to the schools of their choice--public, private, or parochial--made very significant progress in 1993, according to "School Choice Programs: What's Happening in the States,"...
Stressed out? Junk Food Won't Help
When people feel stress rising, most either stop eating altogether or binge on high-fat, high-sodium products such as chocolate or potato chips. "It's not unusual to hear someone say, |I was so stressed yesterday that I went home and ate [a whole]...
Teaching Kids to Delay Gratification
The philosophy of instant gratification is pervasive in American society today. In an era of "instant everything," can children still learn the value of delayed gratification? Moreover, if they can, why should they? "Getting what you want--and getting...
Tide of Humanity Engulfing Host Nations
The number of people crossing international borders each year to escape violence or persecution has increased nineteenfold in the past two decades and is climbing steeply, according to United Nations statistics cited by the Worldwatch Institute, Washington,...
Tougher Oversight of Schools Needed
Under new rules issued by the U.S. Department of Education, states must provide more rigorous, coordinated monitoring of trade schools, colleges, and universities. Greater accountability and monitoring also will be expected of the agencies that accredit...
"Tracking" Harms Many Students
A study on tracking in high schools shows the system of placing some students in college preparatory courses and others in easier math and science courses is "harming millions of students in American society," notes Sanford Dornbusch, the Reed-Hodgson...
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