USA TODAY

USA Today is a monthly magazine published by The Society for the Advancement of Education.

Articles from Vol. 136, No. 2753, February

Benefits of Community Health Screenings
Consumers who queue up for health screenings at the mall, a senior center, a drug store, or other retail business could benefit from the information they learn. However, screenings in community settings have limitations. Proponents of community-based...
Chronic Stress Steals Years from Caregivers
The chronic stress that spouses and children develop while caring for Alzheimer's disease patients may shorten the caregivers' lives by as much as four to eight years, suggests a study from Ohio State University, Columbus. The research provides concrete...
Dark Days for the Dark Continent
There is no precedent for the number of lives affected by the HIV epidemic, maintains Lester R. Brown, president of Earth Policy Institute, Washington, D.C., and author of Plan B 3.0: Mobilizing to Save Civilization. To find anything similar to such...
Decision Analysis of When to Have Child
Women seeking to balance career, social life, and family life in making the decision on when to have a child may benefit from applying formal decisionmaking science to this complex emotional choice. "This decision is too complex to logically consider...
Drawing Blood No Longer Necessary
A technology for cancer detection that eliminates the need for drawing blood has been developed by researchers at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind. In addition to being less invasive, the new detection method is able to evaluate a much larger...
Drug Marketing Aids Medical Decisions
When it comes to giving samples and writing prescriptions, physicians are swayed by science--not by cozy relationships between themselves and pharmaceutical marketing reps or by advertising aimed at patients, maintains research from Emory University,...
Gastric Bypass Extends Lifespan
Gastric bypass and other abdominal surgeries--means of helping severely obese individuals lose large amounts of weight--have gained in popularity as more people see their relatively immediate success in individuals wanting to drop 50, 60, or more pounds....
HIV-1 in U.S. Traced Back to Haiti
The AIDS virus entered the U.S. via Haiti, probably arriving in just one person in about 1969, earlier than previously believed, according to research by the University of Arizona, Tucson. After the virus, HIV-1, came into the U.S., it flourished and...
Insulin Pen Saves Thousands of Dollars
Diabetics who need to switch from oral medications to insulin could reduce their annual health care costs up to $17,000 by using an insulin pen instead of a syringe to deliver their daily dose of medication. A study by Ohio State University, Columbus,...
Lowering BMI Cutoff May Reduce Heart Attacks
Existing body mass index criteria for obesity surgery often exclude a group of obese patients at risk for cardiovascular disease, according to researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas. Their study is among the first...
Maternal and Newborn Death Rates Rising
The global maternal death rate is estimated at between 500,000 and 600,000 a year, with 99% of the deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries. However, it not only is mothers who die from the lack of maternal and obstetrical care--statistics...
Meth-Laced Ecstasy Coming from Canda
Ecstasy--or MDMA, a synthetic, psychoactive (mind-altering) drug with hallucinogenic and amphetamine-like properties--laced with methamphetamine (meth) has been entering the U.S. illegal drug markets, particularly in northern border states, warns the...
Microbicide Design for AIDS Prevention
Biomedical engineers have developed a computer tool they say could lead to improvements in topical microbicides being developed for women to use to prevent infection by the virus that causes AIDS, report researchers at Duke University, Durham, N.C....
More Effective Method Needed
A new way to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation that promises to be more effective than standard CPR because it increases nourishing blood flow through the heart by 25% over the current method has been developed by a biomedical engineer at Purdue...
MRI Reveals Disease in "Opposite" Breast
Women with a recent diagnosis of cancer in one breast should have a magnetic resonance imaging screening of the opposite breast, concludes a multicenter study involving University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, researchers. The international research...
New Technique Better Detects Hearing Loss
A new technique to diagnose hearing loss in a way that more accurately reflects real-world situations is being worked on by a researcher from Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind. "The traditional method to assess speech understanding in people...
Opening Doors for African-American Surgeons
"Opening Doors: Contemporary African-American Academic Surgeons" celebrates blacks' countributions to medicine and medical education. It tells the stories of four pioneers who exemplify excellence in their fields and believe in continuing that journey...
Options to Prevent Pounding Pain
Migraines are more than a bad headache. As nearly 30,000,000 Americans can attest, the throbbing pain of a migraine can be debilitating, lasting from a few hours to several days. The condition can be aggravated by light, sounds, odors, exercise, and...
Pill Provides Tasteless Alternative
With ABC movie critic Joel Siegel's passing from colorectal cancer, Americans are reminded once again to undergo a routine colonoscopy starting at the age of 50 to screen for this disease. Timely screenings can detect the majority of colorectal cancers...
Pioneers of the O.R
Here is a closer look at the four pioneers spotlighted in "Opening Doors: Contemporary African-American Academic Surgeons": Dr. Alexa I. Canady is a neurosurgeon and professor of surgery. She was the first African-American woman pediatric neurosurgeon...
Poor Options Affect Kids' Weight Gain
Unhealthy options and pressures influence nearly every part of children's daily lives, maintains a study by the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. It asserts that, in most middle and high schools across the nation, contracts with soft drink bottling...
Preventive Measures for High School Sports
A set of recommendations for precautions that should be followed by parents, coaches, athletic trainers, and other health care professionals and participants in secondary school athletics has been re-released by the National Athletic Trainers' Association,...
Real Food Better Than Supplements
When it comes to boosting antioxidant intake, research indicates there is little benefit from ingesting supplements. A better way, according to nutritionists at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., is eating a diet rich in antioxidant-containing foods....
Sex Ed Programs Actually Can Work
A growing number of sex education programs that support abstinence and the use of contraception for sexually active teens have shown positive effects in delaying first intercourse, improving contraceptive use, and preventing pregnancy or sexually transmitted...
"Skinny Gene" Does Exist
A single gene that might control whether or not individuals tend to pile on fat has been found, a discovery that may point to new ways to fight obesity and diabetes, indicate researchers from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas....
Viable Human Blood Substitute Found?
Every three seconds, someone, somewhere in the U.S. needs a blood transfusion, and one in three people will need a blood transfusion in his or her lifetime. In developing countries, an average of 25% of blood in blood banks is contaminated. In the...
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