USA TODAY

USA Today is a monthly magazine published by The Society for the Advancement of Education.

Articles from Vol. 137, No. 2765, February

Barcode Chip Faster and Cheaper
A "barcode chip" developed by researchers at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, promises to revolutionize diagnostic medical testing. In less than 10 minutes, and using just a pinprick's worth of blood, the chip can measure the concentrations...
Best Ways to Prevent Outbreaks
Employers are responsible for providing a safe and healthful workplace for their employees, which can be a challenge in the height of the flu season, points out the American Industrial Hygiene Association, Bethesda, Md. By following guidelines based...
Best Way to Treat Blunt Trauma Injuries
Endovascular repair--fixing an injury to a blood vessel from inside that vessel--is a better option for individuals who receive highly lethal injuries from falls or high-speed collisions (together referred to as blunt trauma) and is shown to save more...
Can Public Plan Keep Private Policy Costs in Line?
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] A new public health insurance plan that competes directly with private insurers is essential to controlling health care costs and improving the quality of care, according to a report released by the Institute for America's...
Curbing the HIV Scourge: Ignorance and Wrongheaded Policies Continue to Endanger Millions
The key to curbing the AIDS epidemic, which has so disrupted economic and social progress in Africa, is education about prevention, contends Lester R. Brown, president of Earth Policy Institute, Washington, D.C., and author of Plan B: Rescuing a Planet...
Depressed Patients More Likely to Die
Dialysis patients diagnosed with depression are nearly twice as likely to be hospitalized or die within a year than those who are not depressed, suggests research from George Washington University, Washington, D.C. Researchers monitored dialysis patients...
Downright Impressive Artwork
Down syndrome, or Trisomy 21, generally is caused by an error in the development of one of the reproductive cells that combine at conception, resulting in an individual with an extra copy of the 21st chromosome. The overexpression of genes on chromosome...
EPA Finally Sets New Standards
For the first time since 1978, the Environmental Protection Agency has revised the national air ambient quality standard for lead air pollution, a toxin threatening the health of millions of children and adults. The revised standard of 0.15 micrograms...
E-Prescribing Measure Will Cut Costs
A Federal measure that encourages using electronic systems for prescriptions will help deliver safer and more efficient care to patients while also cutting costs, posits Vincent Duffy, a Purdue University professor of industrial engineering and researcher...
Error Rate High for Anticoagulant Therapy
A number of recent high-profile errors related to commonly used blood thinners highlights a safety issue that too frequently results in harm or even death to patients, according to an alert issued by The Joint Commission, Oakbrook Terrace, Ill., which...
HPV Shot for Girls Remains Controversial
The opinions of mothers concerning sexual matters do not play a significant role in their decisions about whether their daughters should receive a vaccine against a sexually transmitted virus, according to a study by researchers at the University of...
Is There a Doctor in the House?
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] As early as next year, there may not be enough surgeons in U.S. hospitals to treat the critically injured or chronically ill, as a study by Ohio State University, Columbus, suggests that the number of available general surgeons,...
Modern Researchers Ignoring Kinsey Report
The landmark "Sexual Behavior in the Human Male" report revealed major insights into bisexual behavior and orientation--without even using the word "bisexual"--when it was published 60 years ago by pioneering sex researcher Alfred Kinsey and his research...
National Library of Medicine Has Four for the Road
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The National Library of Medicine, on the campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., is the world's largest medical library, collecting materials in all areas of biomedicine and health care, as well as works...
New Bacterium Just as Deadly
A new species of bacterium that causes leprosy has been identified through intensive genetic analysis of a pair of lethal infections in the U.S., reports a research team from the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston. All cases of...
New Device Works like an Insect's Eye
An ultrasound probe small enough to ride along at the tip of a catheter can provide physicians with clearer real-time images of soft tissue without the risks associated with conventional X-ray catheter guidance. Biomedical engineers from Duke University,...
New Tool Assesses Speech Development
The number of hearing impaired infants and toddlers who are aided successfully by technological devices, such as hearing aids and cochlear implants, continues to grow, but there still are unknowns about these children's speaking abilities, according...
Nicotine Addiction Reaches 15-Year High
Nicotine dependence has reached a 15-year high, with nearly 75% of people currently seeking tobacco-dependence treatment categorized as highly nicotine dependent. Re search from the American College of Chest Physicians, Northbrook, Ill., reports that...
Obama Promises Aside, No Revolution in Sight
A study involving health care systems in 21 countries--and the prospects for change in response to such common pressures as rising costs and aging populations--casts doubt on the possibility of major overhauls of any of these systems because of the...
"Old Blood" Linked to Infection
Blood stored for 29 days or more, nearly two weeks less than the current standard, is associated with a higher infection rate in patients who received transfusions with the blood, according to a study by the American College of Chest Physicians, Northbrook,...
Smoking Enhances Other Experiences
There may be a very good reason why coffee and cigarettes often seem to go hand in hand. Research suggests that nicotine's power may be in how it enhances other day-to-day experiences. For a smoker who enjoys having coffee, the nicotine may make a...
Tissue-Engineered Marrow a Key Source
Blood vessels that have been tissue-engineered from bone marrow adult stem cells may in the future serve as a patient's own source of new blood vessels following a coronary bypass or other procedures that require vessel replacement, according to research...
Umbilical Stem Cells Provide Safe Blood
Taking blood stem cells collected from an umbilical cord into the lab and expanding their number before transplanting them to replace a patient's blood supply is as safe as a standard cord blood transplant, report researchers at the University of Texas...
VCI Often Confused with Alzheimer's
All dementia is not Alzheimer's--where plaques and tangles form in brain cells for unknown reasons, eventually causing irreparable damage. A less common form of dementia, vascular cognitive impairment (VCI), can be mistaken for Alzheimer's, explain...
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