USA TODAY

Founded in September of 1982, USA Today is a national daily newspaper published by Gannett Co., Inc. The paper has a Mon.-Thurs. circulation of over 2 million readers. The Friday edition of the paper has a circulation of over 2.5 million readers.The Editor of USA Today is John Hillkirk.

Articles from Vol. 135, No. 2734, July

100 Sports 100 Women 100 Inspiring Athletes
SUPERWOMEN: 100 Women-100 Sports is an eye-opening coffee table book that inspired a subsequent photo exhibition that shows female athletes at their best: passionate, determined, and strong. Each of these fearless females offers a unique tale of triumph,...
A Democratic Resurgence?
REPUBLICAN POLITICIANS LOOKING AT the opinion polls in the spring of 2006 had to shudder--Pres. Bush's approval ratings in the low 30s and the Democrats leading by double digits in the congressional matchups. If these numbers continue into November,...
A Hearty Toast to Our Excellent Host
Excalibur Electronics, Miami, Fla., has made knowing everything about your favorite beverages as easy as pressing a button. The company has developed three user-friendly devices that can assist anyone in making a mixed drink and that tell you everything...
Ancient Greece's Death Penalty Dilemma and Its Influence on Modern Society
ABOLITIONISTS attack capital punishment as cruel. Its administration, they insist, is inconsistent, and the jurisprudence which supports it is incoherent. Furthermore, they claim, death as punishment is disproportionate to any crime and out of step...
A Pocketful of Poison
IN THE COLD-WEATHER MONTHS, during the local Youth League-sponsored street hockey season, they're the Rocket and Pocket Rocket--and why not? Their grandmother has been a monster Montreal Canadiens fan since the heyday of Maurice "The Rocket" Richard....
Black Is Back-And Beautiful
The Black Pearl Ornamental Pepper is making its debut. That's right, black, and this year it's not optional. Black-leafed plants are the "little black dress" of the garden world. Everybody needs at least one; they never go out of style and they make...
Boom Times for Protein
MOUNTING PRESSURE on the Earth's land and water resources to produce livestock, poultry, and fish feed has led to the evolution of some promising new animal protein production models, one of which is used by India to produce milk. Since 1970, India's...
Changing Conventions
CHANGE LONG HAS BEEN A TOPIC for discussion and is part of the warp and woof of our world concerning not only culture, but nature as well. The science of physics points out that, in its subatomic insights, the world is in constant molecular change...
Desert Diplomacy: No End in Sight to the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
AFTER SEPT. 11 and the subsequent bombings in Madrid and London, many have asked, "Why do they hate us?" There is, of course, a ready answer: It is the way the West interacts with the Islamic world and, most importantly, it is our policy of supporting...
Disney Does It Again with "Expedition Everest"
A new adventure lies in the Animal Kingdom at Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Fla. The recently opened Expedition Everest takes visitors on a journey through the Himalayan region to Mt. Everest. At just under 200 feet, the structure is the tallest...
Feeling Better by the Dozen
I RECENTLY FINISHED WRITING A TEXT on film comedians from the Depression decade of the 1930s. The study filters its analysis through 12 pivotal pictures. Each represents a mini-microcosm of the comic world of its focus funny person or persons. The...
He Came, He Saw, He Wrote: Almost 200 Years Have Passed since a Lawyer and Part-Time Poet Named Francis Scott Key Had a Ringside Seat to One of the Greatest Battles in American History. When the Smoke Had Cleared, the U.S. Had Defeated Great Britain in the War of 1812 and Our Young Nation Had a New Anthem, "The Star Spangled Banner."
AS THE AUTHOR of our National Anthem, "The Star Spangled Banner," Francis Scott Key, a simple man who loved to read and write poetry while being strongly devoted to his small circle of friends, has become as closely linked to our country's history...
How Could I Be So Stupid? Intelligent Individuals, by Virtue of Being Smart, Often Think That They Cannot Behave Stupidly, but That Is Precisely What Leads Them Down the Garden Path to Behaving in Just Such a Manner
HOW MANY TIMES have you said to yourself, "How could I be so stupid?" Chances are, you really meant it, at least at the time. Why do smart people act stupidly? What, if anything, can they do about it? If it is any consolation, some of the most powerful...
Hurricane Season: Here We Go Again!
An active hurricane season appears imminent, which could have major repercussions for the U.S. economy and the one in six Americans who live on the Eastern Seaboard or along the western Gulf of Mexico, predicts AccuWeather.com, State College, Pa. ...
Imbibing and the Bible: While the Good Book Certainly Does Not Advocate Alcoholism, an Awful Lot of Drinking Was Taking Place during Biblical Times. of Course, the Same Can Be Said Today
CATHOLICS DRINK, but Baptists do not. Episcopalians certainly drink, but Seventh Day Adventists and Mormons do not. Since all Christian groups turn to the Bible to justify their attitude towards alcohol, why are there such sharp divisions? As a guide...
Ironies of Illegal Immigration
PRES. GEORGE W. BUSH'S proposal on immigration delivered during his State of the Union address was a political response to a complex and dire social problem. It is social because it has to do with the integration of American society and its continued...
Looking to Canada for Health Care Reform
The landmark Canadian Supreme Court ruling in Chaoulli v. Quebec may stifle recent efforts to expand government control over health care in the U.S., contends a study from the Cato Institute, Washington, D.C., which dismisses the assumption that compulsory,...
Lying as America's Pastime
EVERYBODY LIES. From the president of the U.S. to Congress to the smallest citizen in the country, we are a nation of liars. Parents still try to teach their children not to do so. They retell the story of George Washington and the cherry tree or recite...
Maine's Own Mona Lisa Mystery
Although the buzz over "The Da Vinci Code" movie has waned, nothing perks up interest in the great Leonardo like one of his original works, and Maine's Portland Museum of Art has one--or does it? All summer long, the museum will display its rarely...
Movies' Unfair Portrayal of Males
Our youngest children learn alarming lessons about men and boys from the many movies they watch, according to a report released by Academy Award-winner Geena Davis' See Jane program, part of the national nonprofit Dads & Daughters initiative. ...
Museum Memo
What's new in museums around the country? Among the more interesting exhibitions on view are: No Limits, Just Edges: Jackson Pollock, Paintings on Paper, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, through Sept. 29. Jackson Pollock, Beneath the Surface:...
No Vacation for Job Seekers
The summer months can be an opportune time to turn up the heat on your employment search, maintains Max Messmer, author of Job Hunting For Dummies and chairman of Accountemps, a Menlo Park, Calif.-based specialized staffing service for temporary accounting,...
Perfecting the Art of International Management & Investment
THE GENERALLY ACCEPTED DEFINITION of a well-managed company is one with high consumer satisfaction, good employee ratings, strong earnings, a solid balance sheet, an increasing worldwide market share, and a record of continually successful product...
Saving the Ownership Society
BEFORE HURRICANE KATRINA flooded the tear ducts of our politicians and the vaults of our Treasury, Pres. George W. Bush had us talking about America's "ownership society." This is one of the best things he has done. He did it prominently in his reelection...
Senate Is Right: FEMA Must Go
A Senate committee's recommendation to abolish FEMA is proper, but the new disaster response agency created in its stead "cannot be just a reshuffling of the deck chairs," cautions David Schanzer, director of the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland...
Staying Ahead of the Storm
A hurricane is approaching, but the power is out. No television. No internet. No local radio. You're in your vehicle frantically trying to get away from the coast. How close is the hurricane? Where is the worst of the storm surge going to hit? You're...
Ten Reasons to "Slow Down" This Summer
For every reason there is to speed, there is a better one not to. Here are 10 compelling reasons to stop driving too fast, presented by Autobytel Inc's "Take the Pledge to Slow Down," a grassroots movement encouraging individuals to take responsibility...
The Georgia Peach Hits His Stride: Determined to "Hurl Red Hell on His Way to a Score, " Ty Cobb Increasingly Became More Aggressive and Imaginative during His First Few Seasons with the Detroit Tigers, Exhibiting a Lethal Combination of Speed, Size, Muscle, and Guile
IN MARCH OF 1907, when the Detroit Tigers' Ty Cobb arrived in camp, it was not as a high-strong rookie eager to make an impression, but as an established, slightly swell-headed lineup regular. His .320 mark in 1906 not only had placed him fifth on...
The Master of 3-D Pop Art: George Bush, Bill Clinton, Julia Roberts, and Bill Gates Are among the Scores of Prominent Patrons of the Arts Who Have Original Fazzino Works-Renowned for Their Vibrant Colors, Exceptional Detail, and Frenetic Energy-In Their Private Collections
AS THE CREATOR of fine art silkscreen serigraphs, Charles Fazzino is best known for his obsession for bright colors, exceptional detail, brilliant storytelling, the frenetic energy infusing his work, and a unique hand-assembled 3-D layering technique...
The Slippery Slope to National Health Care: A Mandate Forcing Individuals to Purchase Health Insurance Not Only Would Be Impractical, Unenforceable, and Prohibitively Expensive, It Would Represent Yet Another Unconstitutional Breach of the People's Right to Live Free from Onerous Government Regulation
ROUGHLY 46,000,000 Americans do not have health insurance. That has sparked a national debate over how to expand coverage, with many people setting a goal of "universal coverage"--that is, every American would have some form of health insurance. Some...
Whatever Happened to the Family Film? Hollywood Today Mistakenly Believes That, to Be Successful, Movies Must Be Hip, Edgy, Shocking, and Rife with Sex, Foul Language, Violence, and Bad Taste
IN TODAY'S WORLD of mass media and instant communication, movies still have an enormous influence on our culture and an even larger effect on young people. Research shows that the average American child between the ages of 2-18 spends five hours and...
"You're a Grand Ole Flag, You're a High Flying Flag"
For more than 200 years, the American flag has been the symbol of our nation's strength and unity. Since Betsy Ross--a Philadelphia seamstress--stitched the first flag in 1777, the "red, white, and blue" is recognized around the world and has been...

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