USA TODAY

USA Today is a monthly magazine published by The Society for the Advancement of Education.

Articles from Vol. 129, No. 2665, October

Adjusting Speech Pitch Improves Hearing
Amplifying sound through a hearing aid does not always help people suffering from hearing loss understand speech better. However, compressing sound frequency--decreasing its pitch--through new computer technology seems to aid those with high-frequency...
Antidepressants May Prove Effective
Many autistic children may suffer from a genetically linked depression that is treatable with antidepressants such as Prozac (fluoxetine). According to Robert DeLong, a pediatric neurologist at Duke University Medical Center, Durham, N.C., about two-thirds...
"Biomaterials" May Speed Regeneration
In the future, doctors may be able to heal damaged tissue faster using a unique blend of biological and inorganic materials. These "biomaterials" are the next frontier in the field of tissue engineering, which involves growing tissues in the lab for...
Early Diagnosis Is Key to Treatment
American cyclist Lance Armstrong has proven that testicular cancer survivors are champions. With his 1999 and 2000 victories in the Tour de France, Armstrong's story brought public attention and helped spread the word about a disease that is the most...
Electronic Device Allays Needle Injection Discomfort
Using electronic anesthesia can reduce discomfort and disruptive behaviors in young, sedated dental patients. Researchers at Ohio State University, Columbus, used electronic dental anesthesia (EDA) to numb the gums of 15 children aged two to four during...
Family History May Be Key to DISEASE RISK
Studies emphasize the role of family history in assessing a woman's overall risk of certain diseases, such as breast, ovarian, and other cancers. One such report in the Journal of the American Medical Association reviews the case of a 40-year-old woman...
Fish Oil Reduces Clotting in Dialysis
Fish oil supplements dramatically can reduce clotting, a common and serious complication for patients with kidney failure who rely on dialysis treatments, notes Paul Schmitz, associate professor of internal medicine in the Division of Nephrology, Saint...
Health Beat
Gene mutations are not the only types of defects involved in the transformation of healthy cells into malignant ones. According to researcher Christoph Plass, Ohio State University, Columbus, am other defect--one that turns off genes without changing...
HEALTH HISTORY NOTEBOOK Can Improve Medical Care
Planning for your physician visit has become essential now that doctors are busier and appointment times are shorter at the nation's clinics, maintains Margaret Wellington, a research nurse at Stanford (Calif.) University Medical Center. "First and...
How Some Cancers Infect Cells
Researchers at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind., have identified the role of a protein segment that allows some cancer-causing viruses to latch onto and infect cells. Analysis of the protein segment--which bears a striking resemblance to bee...
Low-Dosage Morphine Aids Heart Patients
A new twist on an old method of relieving pain could help heart patients recover from surgery in relative comfort without the troublesome side effects of narcotic pain medication, researchers at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, N.J.,...
Low-Fat Diet Reduces Cramps and PMS
Women following a low-fat, vegetarian diet can expect significant reductions in menstrual pain and PMS symptoms, according to a study conducted by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine in conjunction with the Department of Obstetrics and...
More Bacteria Present Than Previously Thought
The human mouth is awash with bacteria. Mostly neighborly bugs, they live on teeth and gums, helping to digest food and ward off attack by less-friendly, disease-causing bacteria that can steal their way in. According to researchers at Stanford (Calif.)...
New Procedure Starves Fibroids
The latest weapon against tumors is a limber catheter about the width of uncooked spaghetti. Stanford (Calif.) University School of Medicine radiologists have begun using it to strangle fibroids, a common kind of uterine tumor. Shorter hospital stays--usually...
New Treatment Patches Abdominal Aneurysms
Surgeons at Saint Louis (Mo.) University School of Medicine are providing the first new treatment options for abdominal aortic aneurysms in 40 years. The minimally invasive method to repair damaged arteries provides an alternative to the more taxing...
Obesity Drugs
Not a Quick Fix Researchers understand more about the problem of obesity than at any other time in history, but the number of obese Americans continues to increase. Although the search for effective treatments has intensified, just a small number...
Patients Do Better with Fewer Pills
Based on an analysis of more than 3,000 patients involved in triple-drug combination trials to treat HIV infection, researchers at Duke University Medical Center, Durham, N.C., say that patients who take fewer pills tend to do better than those who...
Radical Changes for Dietary Guidelines
The American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) is proposing a sharp shift in the way Americans think about a healthy diet. In comments submitted to the U.S. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, the Institute called for shifting emphasis away from...
Scans of Gulf War Veterans Show Damage
Brain scans of veterans who returned sick from the Gulf War show evidence of significant brain-cell loss, according to University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas researchers. Using magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy--highly specialized...
"Sling" Can Prevent Loss of Control
It doesn't take much to trigger a leak--perhaps just sneezing, laughing, or lifting a child. So the millions of Americans with stress incontinence are constantly on guard, never knowing when the next wet patch will appear, Exercises and medication...
Strategies to Reduce Noncontact ACL Injuries
An estimated 80,000 anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears occur annually in the U.S., with the majority of these knee injuries sustained by 15- to 25-year-olds. The cost of repairing these injuries is almost $1,000,000,000 each year. With 70% of ACL...
Systolic Blood Pressure Key for Elderly
Blood pressure is typically recorded as two numbers--the systolic pressure (as the heart beats) over the diastolic pressure (as the heart relaxes between beats), in the past, many physicians relied on diastolic blood pressure to diagnose hypertension....
Tailoring Use of Platelet Inhibitors
Researchers at Duke University Medical Center, Durham, N.C., think they know why glycoprotein IIb/IIIa platelet inhibitor drugs, collectively known as "super aspirins," produce only modest benefits for patients with acute coronary syndromes--they are...
Tips for a Well-Stocked Medicine Cabinet
When it comes to your health and the health of your family, it is critical always to be prepared for the unexpected. Quick responses to medical emergencies can save lives. The following tips for what a well-stocked medicine cabinet should contain can...
Violent Collisions Cause Most Hockey Injuries
Body checking--a hockey player slamming into a competitor at high speed--causes most injuries in college games, according to a Ball State University, Muncie, Ind., study. A survey of reported injuries from seven teams in the Eastern College Athletic...
Web Medicine: The New "Apple a Day"?
The Internet has the potential to affect dramatically the way medicine is practiced in this country, but surfing the Web is not going to replace a visit to the doctor's office any time soon, maintains James Anderson, a professor of medical sociology...
We're Number 37!
FEELING ILL? If so, you might consider catching the next plane out of the country, because the World Health Organization says your health is best served by nations like Andorra, Cyprus, or even Colombia. Each outperforms the U.S. health care system...
What's Behind the Pain of MIGRAINES
It can strike without warning, an intense, often debilitating headache that can last for hours or days. For millions of Americans who suffer from migraines, this isn't a nightmare--it's an unfortunate fact of life. The Council on Headache Research,...
WINTER the Most Dangerous Season
According to the National Heart Foundation, if you have cardiac disease, here is one more reason to dread winter--it's the most dangerous season for people with all types of heart conditions. A large French study revealed that deaths from heart failure...
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