USA TODAY

USA Today is a monthly magazine published by The Society for the Advancement of Education.

Articles from Vol. 141, No. 2808, September

America as Europe
MORE THAN three years into Barack Obama's presidency, the U.S. economy remains stalled in a holding pattern of painfully slow job growth--after the Great Recession officially was declared to be over in 2009. When the Federal economic stimulus bill...
Artistic Lovers Were a Surreal Piece of Work
MAN RAY (born Emmanuel Radnitzky, 1890-1976) was a leader in two pioneering modern art movements, Surrealism and Dad& but never was invested deeply in either of the two. Although accomplished as an avant-garde photographer, he eschewed labels and...
Beware the Spendthrift Twins
WHILE ADVANCING the central thesis of his new book, End This Depression Now/, Nobel laureate economist and New York Times columnist Patti R. Krugman has become a spokesman who outflanks Pres. Barack Obama on the left in this election season--no easy...
Big Government's Big Solutions Beget Bigger Problems
A NUMBER of arguments have been marshaled to have the government "do something" about the U.S.'s heavy reliance on oil imports. Most of those, however, fail to withstand any serious scrutiny. Worries about the reliability of foreign oil supplies are...
Christian Women Want to Give
Many churches are missing opportunities to involve Christian women in philanthropy, with ministry leaders too often speaking "man to man"--despite the fact that the female population now controls more than 51% of personal wealth nationally. While Christian...
Cinema's Favorite Crime of the Century: Leopold and Loeb's "Thrill" Killing of a Defenseless Teenager Still Horrifies and Fascinates Movie Audiences Today
THROUGH THE YEARS, there have been many alleged "trials of the century," ranging from the 1931 Charles Lindbergh baby kidnapping (with the visceral revelation that the child accidentally was dropped and killed before the crime even was completed) to...
Creatures That Light It Up: This Exhibition Examines a Remarkable Variety of Bioluminescent Organisms, Found Everywhere from Your Own Backyard to the Depths of the Deepest Ocean
"CREATURES of Light: Nature's Bioluminescence" explores the extraordinary organisms that produce light through chemical reactions. "The discoveries of our scientists and their colleagues about all the amazing ways species--many of them new to science--are...
Disability Should Not Be Disabled
LONG-TERM FINANCIAL security is an increasingly troublesome topic for most Americans. Our plates are not just full with planning for today, but for the tomorrows to come, however many there may be. In such an economically conscious society, the amount...
Do Not Get Caught with Assets Showing
In Florida, a man serving 12 years in prison for DUI manslaughter is suing his victim's survivors for his pain, suffering, medical bills, and "loss of capacity for enjoying life." In Illinois last year, siblings aged 20 and 23 sought more than $50,000...
Ecosystem Models the Academic Jungle
Understanding how a species battles to sustain itself in a challenging habitat is a cornerstone of ecological research; now scientists have applied this approach to discover why women are being driven out of academia. Their results, published in Oikos,...
Establishing-And Enforcing-Mom Code: Working Mothers and Stay-at-Home Moms Alike Are in Need of Some Unwritten Rules of Conduct-For Themselves and Others
I FACE SO MANY challenges as a married mom of four trying to build a company. We just never have a drama-free week: forgotten meds, wrong shirt on field trip day, improper clothes or shoes for after-school sports--and then several times a year planning,...
Eurozone Now Is Danger Zone Igniting a Worldwide Crisis: The Potential Collapse of the Euro Has Brought Europe-And Much of the Global Economy, Including That of the U.S.-To Its Knees
FOR ECONOMIST, author, and syndicated columnist Thomas Sewell, the first lesson of economics concerns the scarcity principle, stipulating that there never is enough of anything to satisfy the desires of everyone fitly. Sewell's corollary is that the...
Exhibition Showcases Retrospective of Golden Age Illustrator's Work
"HOWARD PYLE: American Master Rediscovered" is on view through Oct. 28 at the Norman Rockwell Museum, Stockbridge, Mass. The exhibition showcases 79 original paintings and drawings created by Pyle between 1876-1910, on loan from the Delaware Art Museum,...
Federal Student Aid Triggers the Law of Unintended Consequences
FEDERAL STUDENT financial assistance programs are costly, inefficient, byzantine, and fail to serve their desired objectives. In a word, they are dysfunctional, among the worst of many bad Federal initiatives. These programs commonly are rationalized...
Fingerprints Now Can Tell a Lot More
It long has been established that fingerprints can be used to identify people or help convict them of crimes. Things have gone a lot further now: fingerprints can be used to show that a suspect is a smoker, takes drugs, or has handled explosives, among...
"Frontline" Studies Education & Election
What does it take to save a student? Every year, hundreds of thousands of teenagers in the U.S. quit high school without diplomas--an epidemic so out of control that nobody knows the exact number. What is clear is that massive dropout rates cripple...
Grow Up, Already
I USE THE TERM GROWNUP on purpose because, as has been noted previously in this column, "adult" is corrupted. It often is used as a synonym for either senescent or obscene. I say grownup, and I mean it. Nearly 20 years ago, I recall very clearly being...
Hearts of Darkness
THEY ARE HUNGRY; they are greedy; and they can weigh billions and billions of times more than our sun. Indeed, anything that wanders too close to their gravitational embrace, cannot escape their clutches--not even light. They are supermassive black...
Heralding the "People of the Book"
THE LAND OF ISRAEL always has been a cultural crossroads. On this balmy, fight-kissed sliver of terrain between the Arabian Desert and the Mediterranean Sea, the beliefs and material culture of locals, nomads, and invaders have intermingled for millennia....
Insurance Rates Savings Possible
There is nothing that makes your wallet squeal louder today than pulling into a gas station and dropping around $75--and there are predictions that gasoline prices eventually will reach five dollars per gallon. The average household now spends $50...
Leaning Way to the Left
I HOPE readers will forgive the personalization of this essay, but politics and its effect on higher education can be very individual. I have been on the major legislative body of my university, the University Senate, for about 20 years longer than...
Learning Why the Sea Is a Mystical Place
JUST A SHORT ferry ride from our home on Long Island is Connecticut's Mystic Aquarium, a hands-on environment with remarkable marine animals and exhibits--perfect for a family day trip. Operated by the Sea Research Foundation, whose mission is to inspire...
Let's Get Serious for a Change
EVERY FOUR YEARS, presidential campaigns engage in a lot of windy talk that this election is the most important of our lifetime. If these elections were supposed to be so momentous, why did recent campaigns fill us with irrelevancies such as Bill Clinton's...
"Losing Yourself" in a Fictional Character
When you "lose yourself" inside the world of a fictional character while reading a story, you actually may end up changing your own behavior and thoughts to match that of the character, suggests a study published in the Journal of Personality and Social...
Matching the Master
MANY ARTISTS who have achieved significant recognition for their work initially were moved to create because they possessed a natural gift, and Norman Rockwell was no exception. Known as a masterful visual storyteller and the unrivaled creator of fictional...
Monumental Failures
THIS HAS BEEN an extraordinary time for American monuments. The memorial at Ground Zero opened last September in New York. One month later came the dedication of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C., and soon to come to Washington--or...
More to Fear Than Fear Itself
IN HIS 1933 inaugural address, Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt said, "Let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself--nameless, unreasoning unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance."...
Most People Blow Half of Inheritance
Adults who receive an inheritance save only about half, while spending, donating, or losing the rest, indicates a study in the Journal of Family and Economic Issues. The results are good news for retailers, restaurant owners, and people in the service...
Museum Memo
What's new in museums around the country? Among the interesting exhibitions on view are: Whistler's Neighborhood: Impressions of a Changing London, Sept. 8-Sept. 8. 2013, Freer Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Worlds within Worlds: Imperial...
Music to Our Ears: School Budget Cuts Are Claiming Valuable Music Programs as Victims-Until Rescued by Electrify Your Strings!
WATCHING children's faces when they master a new song on their instrument or with their voice can be a life-changing experience. Confidence building, empowerment, sense of self, and learning diversity in our culture all are vital ingredients not only...
Nukes Getting Nuked
ON MAY 5, 2012, JAPAN shut down its Tomari 3 nuclear reactor on the northern island of Hokkaido for inspection, marking the first time in more than 40 years that the country had not a single nuclear power plant generating electricity. The March 2011...
On the Cusp of a Cure: We Can Beat Alzheimer's Crushing Burdens on Families and Society-And Help May Be Here Soon
I HAVE DEVOTED my professional life to finding treatments---and, I hope, someday cures--for malignant brain tumors, because I always have thought nothing could be worse than a diagnosis of brain cancer. The brain and its thought- and emotion-processing...
Our Returning Troops Deserve Financial Literacy Training
ALICE TRAVELED from one world to another in her journey into Wonderland. Nearly 150,000 American service members returned from Iraq and Afghanistan in 2011, and tens of thousands more are returning this year. Like Alice entering a bizarre new world...
Revolution in the Balance
STRATEGY WAS not a word George Washington ever used. It entered the language after his death, at about the same time Napoleon Bonaparte's startling triumphs expanded the understanding of warfare itself--and not until even later, when Carl von Clausewitz...
Serious Problems on Food Front
In the early spring, U.S. farmers were on their way to planting some 96,000,000 acres of corn, the most in 75 years. Warm weather get the crop off to a great start. Analysts were predicting the largest corn harvest on record, explains Lester R. Brown,...
Skin Care That Defies Aging
Finally, there is clinically-proven skincare safe for all skin types. Fiafini Skincare products protect the skin naturally from environ mental and free radical damage, dehydration, and irritation--and deliver safe, powerful, visible antiaging benefits...
Some Multitasking More Dangerous Than Others
People are better at some types of multitasking than they are at others, according to a study from Ohio State University, Columbus, that has implications for distracted drivers. Attempting to do two visual tasks at once hurts performance in both tasks...
Taking Obama and His Administration to School
BY NOW, it is no secret that a central messaging point of Pres. Barack Obama's first term in office as well as his reelection campaign is that Wall Street has harmed the U.S. He has described those involved in the financial industry as "fat cat bankers"...
The 15 Trillion Dollar War on Poverty Is a Failure
NEWS THAT the poverty rate has risen to 15.1% of Americans, the highest level in nearly a decade, has set off a predictable round of calls for increased government spending on social welfare programs. Yet, this year the Federal government will spend...
The Obama Way
ON MAY 19, 2011, in a major address to the people of the world, Pres. Barack Obama maintained, "We believe the borders of Israel and Palestine should be based on the 1967 lines with mutually agreed swaps, so that secure and recognized borders are established...
Was America Born of Dumb Luck or Military Genius?
George Washington, commander in chief of the colonies' Continental Army and the nation's first president, often is praised for his strength of character, extraordinary leadership, and charismatic charm, but historians cannot seem to agree on the extent...
When Less Food Means More Weight
Obesity has become such an epidemic in the U.S. that the Food and Drug Administration is considering approving a new prescription weight-loss drug despite safety concerns about it. (Qnexa was rejected by the FDA two years ago.) This turn of events...
When There Is a Story to Tell
"WHEN, however, I came under the tuition of Howard Pyle I began to think of illustration in a fight different from that of a 'pot-boiler,'" Jessie Willcox Smith told a reporter in 1922. Seeing the possibilities of illustration in a new fight required...
Women Are a Woman's Best Friend
Some say the 1960s hippies are going back to the commune. Others call the growing number of female Baby Boomers rooming together "The Golden Girls' phenomenon." Author Martha Nelson, who at 65 is on the leading edge of a tsunami of retiring Boomers,...
Women over 50 Falling into "Food" Trap
Eating disorders commonly are seen as issues faced by teenagers and young women, but a study from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, reveals that age is no barrier to the condition. In women aged 50 and over, 3.5% report binge eating and...
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