USA TODAY

USA Today is a monthly magazine published by The Society for the Advancement of Education.

Articles from Vol. 143, No. 2835, December

America's Birds More at Risk Than Ever
Global warming threatens nearly half the bird species in the continental U.S. and Canada, insists a study by the National Audubon Society, New York, which identifies 126 species that will lose more than 50% of their current ranges--in some cases up...
$Ave by Winterizing Home Plumbing
When the first big winter storm hits, many people focus on prepping the outside of the home by, for instance, shoveling snow and spreading de-icer. However, homeowners also should take preventative steps indoors, advises Roto-Rooter, Cincinnati, Ohio,...
Be Careful Where You Spit Those Old Fillings
Standards to help cut discharges of dental amalgam into the environment have been proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency under the Clean Water Act. Amalgam is a mixture of mercury and other metals that dentists use to fill cavities. Mercury...
Be Prepared Instead of Quaking in Your Boots
The 6.0 magnitude earthquake that stuck California last summer serves as a stark reminder for the 42 U.S. states at-risk for earthquakes to take action to prevent injuries, post-earthquake fires, and property damage before the ground shakes, cautions...
Coping with Seasonal Affective Disorder
There are those who experience a change of moods during the winter months, particularly a sense of depression or sadness. If you are feeling under the weather but are not sure if you are the victim of seasonal affective disorder, here are the symptoms,...
Does "Hurried" Report Assuage Fears?
An assessment examining the causes of and lessons learned from Japan's 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident is notable for the extent to which it affirms the culture of safety adhered to by the U.S. nuclear industry, according to a study by the...
Energy Star Homes Fail to Resell at a Premium
Consumers pay extra for an Energy Star home, expecting its greater energy efficiency will save money. They apparently plan to recoup the extra cost of purchase by passing it along to the next owner--except they do not, asserts Carmen Flores, an environmental...
Fighting Crime through Crowdsourcing
Crowdsourcing utilizes the input of a crowd of online users to solve problems collaboratively. To advance this emerging technology, researchers at the University of Miami, Coral Gables, Fla., are developing a computing model that employs crowdsourcing...
GOP Now Responsible for Fate of ObamaCare
The time for Republican self congratulation concerning the midterm elections is over, and the work needs to begin, insists Jane M. Orient, executive director of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons and president of Doctors for Disaster...
Hospitalized Soldiers Suicide Rate Increases
Army soldiers hospitalized with a psychiatric disorder have a significantly elevated suicide risk in the year following discharge from the hospital, according to research from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)....
How Will Wind Farms Affect Marine Life?
Offshore wind farms will allow renewable energy to be generated with little or no carbon dioxide emissions, but little is known about how they could impact the marine species living and migrating along the coast. A study led by the University of Maryland...
Human-Animal Health Link of Ebola
For many individuals, global public health seems like an abstract and distant problem--until the Ebola virus is diagnosed among people in our midst. Though no one would call the Ebola pandemic a good thing, it has presented an opportunity for scientists...
Human Clinical Trial of Ebola Vaccine Begins
Human testing of a second investigational Ebola vaccine candidate is underway at the National Institutes of Health's Clinical Center, Bethesda, Md. Researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) are conducting the...
Midge Has Smallest Insect Genome to Date
Scientists who sequenced the genome of the Antarctic midge suspect the genome's small size--the smallest in insects described to date--probably can be explained by the creature's adaptation to its extreme living environment. The midge is a small,...
Mistreatment among Residents Prevalent
Resident-to-resident elder mistreatment affects nearly 20% of residents. Inappropriate, disruptive, or hostile behavior among nursing home residents is a sizable and growing problem, according to research from Weill Cornell Medical College, New York....
Nature's Fury: The Science of Natural Disasters
From earthquakes and volcanoes to tornadoes and hurricanes, nature's forces shape our dynamic planet and often endanger people around the world. "Nature's Fury: The Science of Natural Disasters" uncovers the causes of these natural disasters, explores...
Offseason Baseball Banter Focuses on Fall Classic's Faux Pas: Did a Mere Two Pitches Decide the World Series?
Baseball banter this offseason, instead of revolving around the latest free agent signings and managerial hirings and firings, will be centered (or at least it should be) on one pivotal question: why do today's players absolutely refuse to run their...
Proactive Employees Provide Big Benefits
Do genetic factors or environmental factors influence employee proactivity? A psychological sciences professor at Kansas State University, Manhattan, is using twin studies to understand the nature versus nurture debate of the workplace. His answer:...
Problem Gambling Rates Holding Steady
In the past decade, online gambling has exploded and several states have approved measures to legalize various types of gambling. So, it only is natural that the number of people with gambling problems also has increased, right? Wrong, indicate scientists...
Stupidity, Lies, and Videotape
Lies and promises have been a staple of politics since its inception. As the philosopher Plato observed: "... You ... call it propaganda when people are enticed into a change of opinion by promises of pleasure, or terrified into it by threats.... Yes,...
Superstorm Sandy Spurs Smartphone App
An easy-to-use smartphone app developed by engineers at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, N.J., will help keep the lights on in a heavily wooded New Jersey suburb that suffered widespread power outages in 2012 during Superstorm Sandy. Officials in...
Technology-Driven Suitcase Does It All
Smart technology is in our homes, cars, and phones, and soon it will power our luggage, thanks in part to University at Buffalo (N.Y.) engineering student Martin Diz, a doctoral candidate in the aerospace engineering program. He is co-founder and head...
Tennis, Anyone? Millions Are Saying Yes
Tennis is the only traditional participation sport to be ranked in the Top 10 in terms of 2014 participation growth out of nearly 120 sports and activities surveyed by the Physical Activity Council, McLean, Va. In the U.S., tennis grew by 658,000 players,...
The Deadly Politicization of Ebola
"The Ebola story gets stranger every day as Administration officials, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Pres. Barack Obama himself stretch logic and reason to the breaking point and beyond in an attempt to explain away their opposition...
The Problem Is Not What You've Been Told
Utilizing a new method of geochemical forensics to trace how methane migrates under the earth, a team of researchers uncovered the likely source of most natural gas contamination in drinking-water wells associated with hydraulic fracturing--and it...
Treating Diabetes One Meal at a Time
Recent estimates project that as many as one in three American adults will have diabetes in 2050. Two professors from the School of Nutrition & Health Promotion at Arizona State University, Phoenix, have studied how changing one's diet can help...
U.S. Ready for Ebola-10 Patients at a Time
Have you wondered why Ebola patients are being sent to Omaha, Neb.? "It is because one physician, Dr. Philip Smith, had the foresight to set up the Nebraska Biocontainment Patient Care Unit after the 9/11 attacks as a bulwark against bioterrorism,"...
Violent Video Games Spur Child Aggression
According to a study appearing in the journal Psychology of Popular Media Culture, 66% of researchers, 67% of parents, and 90% of pediatricians agree or strongly agree that violent video games can increase aggressive behavior among children. "Some...
What Do American Babies Eat?
You have to be at least two years old to be covered by U.S. dietary guidelines. For younger babies, no official guidance exists other than the general recommendation by national and international organizations that mothers exclusively breastfeed for...
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.