USA TODAY

USA Today is a monthly magazine published by The Society for the Advancement of Education.

Articles from Vol. 143, No. 2839, April

Alzheimer's Drug May Reduce Urge
Binge-eating disorder affects nearly 10,000,000 American adults, by some estimates. It is a vicious condition in which people repeatedly ingest huge amounts of food--often high-calorie sweets and fatty snacks --in a couple hours or less. Perhaps the...
Association and Learning Can Lead to Exposure
The ability to adopt new behaviors and ideas--whether learned or invented--has helped humans develop everything from stone tools and agriculture to revolutionary communications technologies like the Internet, but research shows that this ability may...
Blame the Jetstream for Crazy Weather Patterns
Prolonged cold snaps on the East Coast, a severe drought in California, and frozen mornings in the South all have something in common--the atmospheric jet stream that transports weather systems has taken to meandering all over North America. Climate...
Can a Planet in Distress Keep It Up?
Global oil consumption has reached an all-time high, the number of workers in vulnerable employment exceeds 1,500,000,000 people, and physical water scarcity affects some 1,200,000,000 individuals, according to research from the Worldwatch Institute,...
Drones Assess Damage Quickly and Safely
Drones, or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), have become increasingly popular over the last half-dozen years or so among amateur aeronautical aficionados, engineers, and generally anyone fascinated with relatively inexpensive flying machines. They can...
HR Executives Favor Salary Transparency
With more attention being paid to issues of pay--such as CEO salaries, minimum wages, and the ever-widening income gap--one workplace policy is likely to become an increasingly hot topic in the latter half of this decade: salary transparency. While...
Income Inequality Unhealthy for Americans
"Income inequality" already has become a buzz phrase for the campaigns leading up to the 2016 elections. Likely candidates and pundits on both ends of the political spectrum have begun to talk about how fairness, social justice, and the cost of health...
It Is the Opposite of Opposites Attract
One of popular culture's most persistent theories when it comes to how we choose our mates is something we all have heard before: opposites attract. However, is it true? Not so much, according to researchers in the Department of Family Studies and...
"Jeopardy!" Champ Watson Assists Doctors
Research unveiled two new Watson-related cognitive technologies that are expected to help physicians make more informed and accurate decisions faster and to cull new insights from electronic medical records. The projects known as "Watson Paths" and...
Job Seekers Are on the Move
The percentage of job seekers relocating for new positions rose to its highest level in five years, as ongoing improvements in the employment and housing markets made moving for employment a more palatable option for those in transition. An average...
Men More Likely to Write One
A heartfelt birthday message from Johnny Cash to his beloved wife June has been voted the greatest love letter of all time. The simple, but plainly expressed missive in which the singer dubbed the Man In Black writes, "You're the object of my desire,...
Newton's Laws of Notion Predict Animal Movement
As deforestation, climate change, and other pressures threaten habitats, how might chimpanzees adapt? An interdisciplinary research team has turned to the physical laws that govern matter to explore one facet of this question: how the animals will...
Organic Farming Proves a Sustainable System
Since 1999, the global land area farmed organically has expanded more than threefold, according to research conducted by the Worldwatch Institute, Washington, D.C. Regions with the largest certified organic agricultural land are Oceania, including...
Parents Help Create Their Own Little Narcissists
Children whose parents think they are God's gift to the world do tend to outshine their peers--in narcissism. In a study that aimed to find the origins of narcissism, researchers surveyed parents and their children four times over a one-and-one-half-year...
Protein Booster May Lead to Shots of DNA
Scientists have discovered a new way to manipulate how cells function, a finding that might help advance an experimental approach to improving public health: DNA vaccines, which could be more efficient, less expensive, and easier to store than traditional...
Racing to Save World's Oldest Mummies
At least 2,000 years before the ancient Egyptians began mummifying their pharaohs, a hunter-gatherer people called the Chinchorro living along the coast of modern-day Chile and Peru developed elaborate methods to mummify not just elites, but the ordinary...
Rainfall Reduction Linked to Industrial Emissions
Clues left behind in a cave in Central America have allowed an international, multidisciplinary team of researchers, including several from the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, to produce a paleoclimate rainfall record that illustrates the contribution...
Rising City Populations Face Unique Challenges
The World Health Organization identifies the rapid increase of urban populations, especially slum populations, as the most important issue affecting health in the 21st century. The agency cites overcrowding, lack of safe water, and improper sanitation...
Sea Level Rise Continues to Accelerate
The acceleration of global sea level change from the end of the 20th century through the last two decades significantly has been swifter than scientists thought, according to a study in Nature. Coauthored by earth scientists Carling Hay and Eric...
Southwest Megadrought Overcome by Cooperation
The more you know your neighbors, the better off you may be when disaster strikes, suggests a study from the University of Arizona, Tucson. Researchers in the School of Anthropology examined social networks in the late pre-Hispanic Southwest and found...
The Plains Indians: Artists of Earth and Sky
The exhibition "The Plains Indians: Artists of Earth and Sky" brings together more than 150 works--many never before seen in a public exhibit in North America. Ranging from an ancient stone pipe and painted robes to drawings, paintings, collages, photographs,...
The Worst Ways to Quit a Job
"Quit while you're ahead" may take on new meaning thanks to a survey developed by OfficeTeam, Menlo Park, Calif., a staffing service specializing in the placement of administrative professionals. Some 86% of human resources managers interviewed said...
Unexpected Discovery Unveils History
In the wide open spaces of southeastern Arizona you can see for miles under endless blue skies, but a team of archeology students from the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, is looking for the story beneath their feet at the Chiricahua and Ft....
Weights Trim Waist, Aerobics Fights Pounds
Healthy men who do 20 minutes of daily weight training have less increase in age-related abdominal fat than men who spend the same amount of time doing aerobic activities, according to a study in Obesity. Combining weight training and aerobic activity...
What a Messy Desk Says about You
Having a cluttered desk may not be a bad thing, suggests a survey from OfficeTeam, Menlo Park, Calif., a staffing service specializing in the placement of administrative professionals. Sixty-eight percent of human resources managers interviewed feel...
What Is Privacy? New Definition Needed
Out of an anonymous set of credit card data from more than 1,000,000 people, how easily can you find one person? Information gleaned from just four transactions uniquely can identify a person 90% of the time, asserts Vivek Singh, assistant professor...
Whole Lotta Shakin Goin' on in Simulation
It Is one thing to simulate an earthquake on a model structure inside a laboratory. It is another to rattle a standing California building with 50 tons of force. A team led by University at Buffalo (N.Y.) researcher Andreas Stavridis received the rare...
Will Falling Oil Prices Provide a Boost?
"Oil exploration and extraction companies, as well as the companies that supply them, are definitely feeling the impact of the lowest oil prices since 2009. These companies, while reluctant to completely shutter operations, are being forced to trim...
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