USA TODAY

USA Today is a monthly magazine published by The Society for the Advancement of Education.

Articles from Vol. 143, No. 2841, June

Altered Relationship of Rain and Temperature
Man-made aerosol emissions from industrial processes have changed the relationship between temperature and precipitation in the northern tropics, maintains an international team of scientists, including Minghua Zhang, dean and director of Stony Brook...
Aluminum Ready to Take over for Lithium
The first high-performance aluminum battery that is fast-charging, long-lasting, and inexpensive has been invented by scientists at Stanford (Calif.) University. Researchers say the new technology offers a safe alternative to many commercial batteries...
Ancient Parasites Spurred Evolution
Large-scale genetic changes that marked the evolution of pregnancy in mammals have been identified by an international team of scientists. They found thousands of genes that evolved to be expressed in the uterus in early mammals, including many that...
Archaeologists Discover Mayan "Melting Pot"
Researchers working in Guatemala have unearthed information about the Mayan civilization's transition from a mobile, hunter-gatherer lifestyle to a sedentary way of life. Led by archaeologists Takeshi Inomata and Daniela Triadan, the team's excavations...
Asian Secondhand Smog Hits California
Approximately 10% of ozone pollution in California's San Joaquin Valley is estimated to be coming from outside of the state's borders, particularly from Asia, according to research by the University of California, Davis. 'To me, it's an exciting new...
"Assassin" Targets "Local" Supernovae
While many astronomical collaborations use powerful telescopes to target individual objects in the distant universe, a project at Ohio State University, Columbus, is doing something different: employing small telescopes to study a growing portion of...
Automation Solution to Overwhelming Data
It almost is a rite of passage in physics and astronomy: scientists spend years scrounging up money to build a fantastic new instrument. Then, when the long-awaited device finally approaches completion, the panic begins--how will they handle the torrent...
Birds Die off Faster Due to Human Activities
Human activities have caused some 500 bird species worldwide to go extinct over the past 500 years, and 21st-century extinction rates likely will accelerate to approximately 10 additional species per year unless societies take action to reverse the...
California Better Brace for a Whopper
Seismologists have proven that the Hayward Fault essentially is a branch of the Calaveras Fault that runs east of San Jose, which means that both could rupture together, resulting in a significantly more destructive earthquake than previously thought....
Can Survive for Long Periods Minus Oxygen
Pupfish, which are found exclusively in the desert Southwest, can go for up to five hours with nearly no oxygen, and they do this even though oxygen is available, it has been discovered by researchers from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Life...
Cesium Atoms Must Be Shaken, Not Stirred
Scientists discovered in 1937 that liquid helium-4, when chilled to extremely low temperatures, became a superfluid that could leak through glass, overflow its containers, or eternally gush like a fountain. Future Nobel laureate Lev Landau, a Soviet...
Computer-Video Combo Can "See" Vibrations
To the naked eye, buildings and bridges appear fixed in place, unmoved by forces like wind and rain. In fact, though, these large structures do experience imperceptibly small vibrations that, depending on their frequency, may indicate instability or...
Depends on How Hard the Wind Blows
Of the many weather-related factors that contribute to harmful algal blooms (HABs) in Lake Erie, a study by Ohio State University, Columbus, and the University of Florida, Gainesville, has identified one as most important: the wind. Over a 10-year...
Does Money Beget Bigger Brains?
Many years of research have shown that, for students from lower-income families, standardized test scores and other measures of academic success tend to lag behind those of wealthier students. A study led by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute...
Early Diversity Found in Mammals
The fossils of two interrelated ancestral mammals, newly discovered in China, suggest that the wide-ranging ecological diversity of modern mammals had a precedent more than 160,000,000 years ago. With claws for climbing and teeth adapted for a tree...
Explaining Saturn's Great White Spots
Every 20 to 30 years, Saturn's atmosphere roils with giant, planet-encircling thunderstorms that produce intense lightning and enormous cloud disturbances. The head of one of these storms--popularly called "great white spots," in analogy to the Great...
Extreme Climate Change Sped Process
Evidence linking early animal evolution to extreme climate change has been uncovered by an international team of scientists. A dramatic rise in atmospheric oxygen levels long has been speculated as the trigger for early animal evolution, but direct...
Farming in the World's Driest Desert
High in the Atacama Desert, around 10,000 feet, you can look at the fields around Turi, Chile, and see small neatly laid out fields, terraced and lined with rocks. No crops are growing there now, but it looks as though the farmers laid down their stone...
Galaxy Clusters Formed as "Fireworks"
Galaxies such as our Milky Way, with its 100,000,000,000 stars, usually are not found in isolation. In the universe today, 13,800,000,000 years after the Big Bang, many are in dense clusters of tens or even hundreds of galaxies. However, these clusters...
Geographic Detail of Public Opinion
A statistical model that accurately estimates public global warming opinion and public policy support in all 50 states, 435 congressional districts, and more than 3,000 counties and cities across the nation has been developed by a team of researchers...
"Hindcast" Model to Make Better Predictions
Hurricanes are storms with maximum wind speeds in excess of 73 mph and are among the most damaging natural disasters in the U.S. The Atlantic hurricane season lasts from June 1 to Nov. 30. A conventional model can provide its forecast by the start...
Jupiter Cleared Path for Solar System
Jupiter may have swept through the early solar system like a wrecking ball, destroying a first generation of inner planets before retreating into its current orbit, according to a study from the University of California, Santa Cruz. The findings help...
Meteorites Date Moon-Forming Impact
Not too long after the planets began forming, a Mars-sized object slammed into Earth, creating the debris that later would coalesce into the moon. Some of the debris from this giant impact escaped all the way out to the asteroid belt. Collisions there...
NASA Puts Satellite Eyes on Algal Blooms
NASA has joined forces with the Environmental Protection Agency, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and U.S. Geological Survey to transform satellite data designed to probe ocean biology into information that will help protect the American...
Search for Earth-Like Planets Expands
A newly discovered planet in a binary star system located 3,000 light-years from Earth is expanding astronomers' notions of where Earthlike--and even potentially habitable --planets can form, and how to find them. At twice the mass of Earth, the planet...
Shift in Sea Plankton May Threaten Fisheries
A growing "dead zone" in the middle of the Arabian Sea has allowed plankton uniquely suited to low-oxygen water to take over the base of the food chain. This rise to dominance over the last decade could be disastrous for the predator fish that sustain...
Smartphones Provide Early-Warning System
While you are checking your e-mail, scrolling through social-media feeds, or just going about your daily life with your trusty smartphone in your pocket, the sensors in that little computer also could be contributing to an earthquake early-warning...
Squamate Placement Source of Squabble
Squamate reptiles--lizards and snakes--are among the most diverse groups of vertebrates, with more than 9,000 living species. They are important for humans because venomous snakes cause thousands of deaths every year. At the same time, their toxins...
That Bouncing Battery Is Not Dead Yet
Do not throw away those bouncing batteries. Researchers at Princeton (N.J.) University have found that the common test of bouncing a household battery to learn if it is dead actually is not an effective way to check a battery's charge. 'The bounce...
Tick-Borne Diseases outside Usual Borders
As summer approaches, people in the Northeast and Midwest look forward to spending more time outdoors--which also means plotting ways to avoid the disease carrying black-legged deer tick. However, those living outside of these areas also may want to...
Underwater Cave Proves a Treasure Trove
Lagerstatten--that word sends a shiver of excitement up and down the spine of every paleontologist. In German, the word means "storage place" or "deposits" but, in paleontology, it has come to mean a very rich fossil deposit that contains complete...
Ways to Reduce Forest Fragmentation
Forest fragmentation from natural gas development in Pennsylvania is caused by gathering lines, the smaller pipelines that carry extracted natural gas to the main distribution pipes, it has been found by a team of researchers in Carnegie Mellon University's...
Where the Microscope and Photo Lens Meet
Whether a close-up of a leafcutter ant, or a micrograph of the neurons derived from marmoset stem cells, or an MRI of the hidden pathways in the human brain, submissions to the University of Wisconsin-Madison's 2015 Cool Science Image Contest continue...
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