The Antioch Review

The Antioch Review publishes fiction, essays, and poetry from both emerging and established authors. The Antioch Review is one of the oldest literary magazines in the United States and is published by Antioch College.

Articles from Vol. 62, No. 1, Winter

A Conversation with Charles Bernstein
The following interview of Charles Bernstein by David Caplan was conducted by telephone on February 4, 2003, and revised via e-mail. Because Mr. Bernstein presented an excerpt from a larger project at the MLA, he and Mr. Caplan determined that an interview...
Avant-Gardist in the Forest
Lorine Niedecker inhabited a periphery, as a manual laborer and poet, in an unplumbed cabin she built on a peninsula beside the Rock River in Wisconsin. People find places of refuge where they might be secure, say cultural geographers; the margins...
Does Prosody Have a Future?
Audience Member: People have been speaking about the importance of the line and I was surprised in reading the Hix poem that there was no indication in the way that you [Caplan] read it that one was coming to the end of the lines. "Let me start over....
Eavan Boland's Gift: Sex, History, and Myth
Begin in the corner of a room: a young woman seated at a desk trying to make sense of a myth and her place within it through lines of poetry. She has no idea where the story will lead but knows the story is all there is to ferry her safely across this...
Frank Bidart's Poetry: The Substance of the Invisible
Read collectively, Frank Bidart's poems show his art as wildly deliberative and deliberatively wild. The poems are choreographed to careen across the page. They often embrace sensational subjects and extreme emotions, but Bidart's intricate syntax...
Genius as Pariah: The Life and Poems of George Barker
"To be so closely caught up in the teelh of things that they kill you, no matter how infinitesimally kill you, is, truly, to be a poet: and to be a poet in fact it is additionally necessary that you should possess the tongues and instruments with which...
Prosody after the Poetry Wars
"Phil, I'm so happy to be a contemporary: happy to share the language. Tho they climb only the stairway of lost breath, they lion come It is astonishing how they lion come s--Mary and I reading the books all afternoon--" George Oppen, in a letter...
Reading, Raiding, and Anodyne Eclecticism: Word without World
"There's only one real, gut-level sincerity: that as readers we need only what absolutely had to be written, that as writers we must write only what absolutely has to be written. The question--Does this need to be written?--is an ethical one." --Rachel...
"Speaking in Tongues": Exile and Internal Translation in the Poetry of Charles Simic
Touching me, you touch The country that has exiled you. --Charles Simic, "The Wind" In his essays and interviews, Charles Simic often observes that he thinks of himself primarily as an American poet with profound roots in American literature...
Temporal Poetics: Rhythmic Process as Truth
Over the years, many have lamented the weaknesses in prosody (in the sense of our theories of poetic rhythm) and poetics (in the sense of our theories of poetry), but to my knowledge none have claimed that these two weaknesses are closely related....
"The Break Is Not a Break": Kierkegaard, Heidegger, and Poesis as Abiding Love
If my friend says in his mind, I will never see you again, I translate it of necessity into ever. That is its definition in Love's lexicon. --Henry David Thoreau, journal, 24 February 1857 In the chapter "Love Abides," in his Works of Love: Some...
To Translate the Shaking: Contemporary Japanese Women's Poetry (and Coaxing It into English)
The word I see most often in connection with contemporary Japanese women's poetry is yureteiru, shaking. The poetry is not unstable and certainly not indifferent, just shaking--in flux and reaching for a landing point, however impermanent. This shaking...
Vivamus, Vivamus: Living with Ovid's Amores
Prologue with Tristia, Rome, 2003: It is something to be reading Ovid's Tristia at a cafe in Rome--to feel his exile from Rome here in Rome, at a table on a terrace, under a wisteria trellis, with Roman sparrows overhead flirting through the leaves;...
What to Read, What to Praise
"'Communication' will not explain poetry." T.S. Eliot "I could not go up to the door and knock and say: Let me come in and suck your life and sorrow from you as a leech sucks blood; let me gorge myself on your sensations, ideas and dreams; let me...
Working Prosodies: Finding What Will Suffice
When I try to recall when I first became aware of prosody as a central concern in writing poetry, 1 remember, one summer afternoon in my early teens, tapping iambs on a redwood picnic table to compose, The future and the past, tomorrow, yesterday,...