Journal of Higher Education

A journal covering higher education issues in management and teaching for the academic audience.

Articles from Vol. 77, No. 6, November-December

Conceptualizing the Academic Life: Graduate Students' Perspectives
Envisioning a Faculty Life A faculty member passes John R. in the hall during his sophomore year and remarks that John seems to have an academic bent of mind. Another professor, in addition to being a great teacher in the classroom, engages...
Effects of Part-Time Faculty Employment on Community College Graduation Rates
Over the past three decades, one of the most significant changes in the delivery of postsecondary education involves the dramatic increase in the use of contingent or part-time faculty. The pattern is particularly pronounced at community colleges,...
Examining Differences in State Support for Higher Education: A Comparative Study of State Appropriations for Research I Universities
State governments and public colleges and universities have a symbiotic relationship. Public higher education institutions play an important role in creating an educated citizenry and improving state and local economies, while states bear the primary...
Faculty and College Student Beliefs about the Frequency of Student Academic Misconduct
Student academic misconduct, such as cheating and plagiarism, has increased in recent decades (McCabe, Trevifio, & Butterfield, 2001) and is an important concern in higher education. Meanwhile, it has been reported that faculty members often do...
Rethinking Public Higher Education Governing Boards Performance: Results of a National Study of Governing Boards in the United States
Recently the Governor of Oregon asked for resignations of 4 of 11 members of the State Board of Higher Education citing that members had lost sight of important initiatives such as economy development and affordability. This is not an isolated...
Voluntary Association Membership: Black Greek Men on a Predominantly White Campus
There is a stunning disparity between the number of African Americans who start college and those who complete their degree. In 2000, 30% of 18-24-year-old African Americans were enrolled in college, compared to 36% Whites of the same age. However,...