The George Washington International Law Review

The George Washington International Law Review is a magazine focusing on Law

Articles from Vol. 41, No. 4, 2010

A Commentary to Fred Gedicks's Paper: "American Civil Religion: An Idea Whose Time Is Past"
INTRODUCTION: THE VARIABLE MEANINGS OF CONCEPTSFirst of all, thank you for inviting me to take part in the conference at Brigham Young University. Fred Gedicks's paper demonstrates the complexity of the controversial concept of civil religion; an idea...
American Civil Religion: An Idea Whose Time Is Past
I. INTRODUCTION: THE FAILURE OF AMERICAN CIVIL RELIGIONFrom the founding of the United States, its citizens have understood loyalty to their country as a religious and not just a civic commitment. The idea of a "civil religion" that defines the collective...
A Religious Basis of Liberal Democracy*
Not every country that advertises (or advertised) itself as a democracy is (was) in fact a democracy.1 Two examples: The official name of North Korea, translated into English, is the Democratic People's Republic of Korea; the official name of East Germany,...
Civil Religion in France: The Gallican Hypothesis
I. THE MYTH OF THE INDIVISIBILITY OF "LAÏCITÉ" AND NATIONAccording to almost all French scholars, the French Revolution of 1789 changed the link between religion and nation in France. Before the French Revolution, the state did not accept religious dissenters....
Civil Religion in Italy: A "Mission Impossible"?
I. PREMISE: ITALY WITHIN THE GENERAL FRAMEWORKOne must identify some main assumptions before discussing the controversial notion of civil religion in Italy.First, civil religion is a multifaceted notion to which it is very difficult to attach a final...
Civil Religions: Models and Perspectives
I. INTRODUCTIONA few years ago, Peter Berger, Grace Davie, and Effie Fokas published a book entitled Religious America, Secular Europe?1 The authors briefly mention civil religion, noting that this concept originated in Europe, was developed in the United...
Creation and Preservation in the Constitution of Civil Religion
"Civil Religion" in the United States and Europe:Four Comparative PerspectivesMarch 12-14, 2009International Center for Law and Religion StudiesBrigham Young University Law SchoolProvo, Utah, USATwo of the most basic, distinctive, and ennobling human...
Is Laïcité the Civil Religion of France?
According to Robert Bellah, in his article, "Civil Religion in America," civil religion is a combination of collective rituals that reveal a devotion to the unity of a nation and a national mythology made up of a diffusion of beliefs and representations...
Laïcité as Civil Religion: An Italian American Perspective
It is a privilege for me to contribute to this Symposium with such distinguished scholars as Professor Frederick Gedicks and Professor Cole Durham, and to comment on the paper presented by Professor Blandine Chelini-Pont. Especially in this year, it...
Obama and the American Civil Religion from the Political Left
Fred Gedicks has written an interesting paper on the future of civil religion in the United States.1 As Gedicks describes it, the American civil religion, as defined most notably by Robert Bellah several decades ago,2 argues that there is and should...
Sacralization of the State and Secular Nationalism: Foundations of Civil Religion in Turkey
This Article will illustrate how secular nationalism has been introduced as a source of collective identity and as a founding ideology of the Turkish state vis-à-vis the Islamic legacy of the Ottoman Empire. This Article will also locate religion in...
The Changing Civil Religion of Secular Europe
In the last two decades, Europeans have grown increasingly exposed to the global market while they have experienced a rising degree of internal integration due to the creation of the European Union and the impact of the European Court of Human Rights'...
The New American Civil Religion: Lessons for Italy
I. WHY CIVIL RELIGION?Alessandro Ferrari nicely delineates the predicament of civil religion in Italy: centered around a Catholicism that is no longer universal enough to be a basis for national identity.1 The problems he describes are not peculiar to...
Why Are We Talking about Civil Religion Now?: Comments on "Civil Religion in Italy: A 'Mission Impossible'?" by Alessandro Ferrari
I. INTRODUCTIONCrosses of various kinds have served to symbolize aspects of human culture and society over a time and space that both precedes and exceeds Christianity. The simplicity and evocative power of the meeting of two lines and their capacity...
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