Scandinavian Review

Magazine covers all aspects of life in contemporary Scandinavia emphasizing art and design, industrial development, business, political, economic, and social issues.

Articles from Vol. 86, No. 2, Autumn

Alcohol Policy in Sweden and Finland: Challenges for the Future
Ask any Swede and Finn of a certain age how he or she feels about alcohol and the answer will dwell at length on the destructive drinking habits of their compatriots. According to this view, Nordic people consume hard liquor in excessive quantities in...
Cottage Industries: Making a Living in Rural EU Finland
Amid the flat farmlands of southwestern Finland it is an odd sight to detect a herd of bison, freshly imported as a tourist attraction and a source of meat and hides. Their owner, Lauri Hollo, received financial support from the European Union, which...
Iceland's Gentle Wave of Immigration
On June 4, 1998, of this year Reykjavik and its surrounding area was hit by an earthquake measuring 5.3 on the Richter scale, a relatively rare occurrence. This was the largest quake to strike since 1955. People were shaken up, but no one was seriously...
Iceland's Role in a Time of Globalization
The ASF's annual Gala Dinner on October 6, 1998, puts the Republic of Iceland at the center of the celebration, with His Exellency Ragnur Ragnar Grimsson, President of Iceland (since 1996) and his wife, Gudrun Katrin Thorbergsddttir, as the Guests of...
Kjell Magne Bondevik: First Year as Norway's Prime Minister
One day this summer, Prime Minister Kjell Magne Bondevik cheered patriotically for the success of Norway's national soccer team as it competed for the World Cup in a French stadium. The next day, dressed in his minister's cassock, he officiated at his...
Leading a New Nation: Iceland's Five Presidents
A small Icelandic steamship made its way across the Atlantic from New York to Reykjavik late in May 1940. Among its passengers was Iceland's ambassador to Copenhagen, Sveinn Bjornsson, who had been recalled when Germany invaded Denmark on April 9. He...
Modern Sweden: The Declining Importance of Marriage
Swedes marry less, cohabit more, live in single-person households more, and marry at later ages than the people of any other rich country in the world. They divorce almost as much as Americans, the world's champions. Re-marriage rates are low. Since...
Nordic Togetherness: Let Us Count the Ways
An official of the Nordic Ministerial Council was holding a lecture for foreign diplomats stationed in Copenhagen last winter. As he warmed to the theme of Nordic togetherness, one that is much beloved by the Nordic officials, he was abruptly interrupted...
The Bread of Life
My church was Mosfell Church in Mosfellsdale. This particular church was dismantled in 1888, however, fourteen years before I was born, because of a new law that decreed that all small churches, abandoned churches, oratories, chapels and the like in...
The Icelanders: A Study in Contradictions?
Some two years ago a Dutch study concluded that the Icelanders were the "happiest people on earth"-at least that is what most Icelanders like to report. And it is not too far from the truth: Icelanders were deemed to be the happiest, most contented and...
Two-Year U.S. Tour of Norwegian Children's Books
This year marks the 200th anniversary of Norway's first native literary work for children, Lommebog for born (Pocketbook for Children), published in Christiania (Oslo) in 1798. The book was authored by Willum Stephanson, a relocated Dane, who published...
Vilhelm Hammershoi: Denmark's Painter of Solitude and Light
This past year a major exhibition of the paintings of the Danish artist Vilhelm Hammershoi (1864-1916) originated at the Ordrupgaard Museum in Copenhagen. Co-curated by the author of this article, the exhibition then traveled to the Musee d'Orsay in...