Scandinavian Review

Magazine covers all aspects of life in contemporary Scandinavia emphasizing art and design, industrial development, business, political, economic, and social issues.

Articles from Vol. 87, No. 1, Spring

A New Frame for Denmark's National Gallery
On the November 6, 1998, the newly enlarged Statens Museum for Kunst (the Danish National Gallery) reopened its doors to the public, following its closure for two years to allow for an extensive conversion and a major new extension to the existing building....
Bringing Kierkegaard into the 20th Century
Born in Copenhagen as the son of a hosiery shopkeeper, Soren Kierkegaard (18131855) began to study theology at university but fell out with his puritanical father and for a time devoted himself to a life of pleasure before undergoing a religious experience...
Driving Tour: Iceland's Route 1
In Iceland, even after thousands of years of global warming, the Ice Age just won't let go. Mammoth glaciers engulf great chunks of the North Atlantic island in a permanent deep freeze. Europe's largest ice sheet, Vatnajokull, covers 3,200 square miles...
Erik J. Friis (1913-1999) Remembered
Erik J. Frs was Editor of Scandinavian Review and Director of Publications for the ASF for twenty-five years. He also served as Director of the ASF Library, wrote the Foundation's history, and was a distinguished editor and translator. In 1995 the ASF...
Exploring Norway's West Cape
You can't be in Norway very long before you hear the ubiquitous word Stad (pronounced "stahtt"). Virtually every weather forecast refers to Stad. Sailors relate harrowing tales about it. Others speak of Stad with a touch of awe, or trepidation, in their...
Finland at the Helm: Steering the EU into a New Millennium
On July 1, 1999, Finland will lead the European Union (EU) into the 21 st century when the country assumes the EU Council Presidency currently held by Germany. With so many matters pending, the pace is likely to be hectic for the Finns'six-month presidential...
Finland's New Parliament and Government
Finland's parliamentary elections on March 21 turned out quite differently than anyone anticipated. The elections were expected to determine the shape of the new government, but instead they made the negotiations to form it more interesting than the...
Gothenburg: Second to None
Last summer it seemed that I had made a whirlwind visit to Tokyo, Amsterdam, Paris, Sydney, London and St. Petersburg-all in just one weekend-entirely without any jet lag. Did I discover a new travel secret? In a way, yes. I discovered Sweden's second...
In Transition: From Immigration Policy to Integration Policy in Sweden
From an historical perspective, Sweden has been transformed in a very short period from a relatively homogeneous country into a multiethnic and multicultural society. This development has enriched Sweden in many ways but has also created tensions and...
On Horseback: Norway's Old King's Road
Dovre is a popular mountain resort northwest of Lillehammer. During the month of June the snow and ice melt to reveal a rolling landscape of blue and yellow flowers, beds of moss and juniper and days of endless light. In this alpine region where many...
Sibelius at Ainola, His Rustic Retreat
Stereotypes tend to fix themselves in the public perception: the ever-affable Papa Haydn, the child-man Mozart of "Amadeus" caricature; not least, the stoically austere Jan Sibelius (18651957), as granite-willed as his forehead was monumental. In truth,...
The Middle Wharf: A Working Shipyard Museum
A shipyard called Mellemvaerftet sits in a protected end of the ancient harbor, a little to the north of Norway's magnificent fjord region. The latitude is roughly the same as the southern tip of Iceland. Between 1787 and 1794 the Lower and Upper Vagen...
The Saga of the Icelanders: The First Thousand Years
The following are excerpts from a speech given by Ambassador Hannibalsson at The Cosmos Club in Washington, DC, in January 1999. The raison d'etre of the Icelanders If a reasonably knowledgeable Icelander-on his Day of Judgementwere to plead his case...
The Scandinavian Role in International Peace Operations
The United Nations and its peacekeeping missions have enjoyed immense support among the Scandinavian peoples. In the era of the Cold War, one quarter of all the troops in UN missions were provided by the Scandinavians. Of course, the first UN Secretary...
Welfare State Nationalism: Sweden and the Specter of the European Union
When Sweden joined the European Union in 1995 it was only with a slim majority of the population voting "yes." Indeed, even today a considerable part of the population remains opposed to EU membership, making Sweden one of the most antiEuropean of the...