The Journal of Negro Education

The Journal of Negro Education is an academic journal focusing on African American education

Articles from Vol. 72, No. 3, Summer

"Ain't I a Woman, Too?": Tracing the Experiences of African American Women in Graduate School
A group of African American women who had completed or were seeking graduate degrees in education over a 10-year period participated in a study to assess their experiences. Responses were gathered by the use of two surveys mailed to participants followed...
"Intercultural" Perceptions, Academic Achievement, and the Identifying Process of Pacific Islands Students in New Zealand Schools
This article attempts to find a more effective and accurate explanation for the failure of schools to address the lack of academic achievement of Pasifika (Pacific Islands) students in New Zealand education. It is argued here that a necessary condition...
Interest Convergence and Desegregation in the Ohio Valley
This article chronicles the history of two school districts located in the upper Mill Creek Valley of the Greater Cincinnati Metropolitan area. The creation of the Black Lincoln Heights School District and the predominately White Princeton School District...
Reproducing Social Inequalities through Higher Education: Critical Thinking as Valued Capital
The American education system perpetuates the social inequalities of a class hierarchy by allocating differential "educational capital" along class lines. As the culminating stage of an ongoing sorting process operating within the formal schooling structure,...
Using Concept Mapping to Aid African American Students' Understanding in Middle Grade Science
This article reports on the results of a nine-week investigation that examined the effectiveness of concept mapping on science achievement of 182 African American middle grade science students, distributed into eight intact earth science classes (by...
Welcome Consequences and Fulfilled Promise: Julius Rosenwald Fellows and Brown V. Board of Education
In preparing its second brief in the Brown v. Board case, the NAACP relied heavily on the knowledge and research skills of many scholars, a number of whom had pursued graduate studies with awards from the Julius Rosenwald Fund, a foundation devoted to...
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