Journal of Legal Economics

Academic journal publishes analytical articles on economic damages in litigation settings.

Articles from Vol. 16, No. 2, April

Calculating a Taxable Damages Award: A Comparison of Two Calculation Methods
Abstract This paper presents a comparison of two damage calculation methods that are used in litigation when the damage award is taxable. One damage calculation method discounts before-tax damage cashflows with a before-tax discount rate. The other damage...
Daniel Bernoulli on the Measurement of Risk
(ProQuest: ... denotes formulae omitted.)I. IntroductionThe Bernoulli family produced many leading politicians, jurists, business men, scientists, and mathematicians. Leon Bernoulli (died 1570), the patriarch of the family, emigrated from Antwerp in...
Estimating Housing Expenses on Children: A Comparison of Methodologies
AbstractThe U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has provided estimates of expenditures on children since 1960. Forensic economists use these figures in wrongful death and birth cases, as well as in child support cases. Estimating housing expenses on...
Life Expectancies, Joint Life Expectancies, Life Annuities, and Joint Life Annuities
(ProQuest: ... denotes formulae omitted.)I. IntroductionDavid Tucek recently gave a careful explanation of how to construct a life table (Tucek 2009). This paper briefly reviews part ofthat paper, extends the discussion to joint life expectancy, and...
Starting Salaries of College Graduates: An Analysis of the 1998-2008 Era
I. IntroductionAnalyzing the value of the lost potential earning capacity of individuals who are just starting, or have yet to start, their careers is one of the most difficult challenges a forensic economist faces. Individuals without work histories...
The Impact of Disability on Earnings and Labour Force Participation in Canada: Evidence from the 2001 PALS and from Canadian Case Law
AbstractUsing Statistics Canada's 2001 "Participation and Activity Limitation Survey" (PALS) this paper examines the impact of disability on the annual earnings and labour force participation of Canadian men and women. The study's findings include estimates...
Why Markov Process Worklife Expectancy Tables Are Usually Superior to the LPE Method1
AbstractBased on surveys of members of the National Association of Forensic Economics (NAFE), the predominant method for calculating worklife expectancy involves the use of Markov process statistical worklife expectancy tables, with the LPE method as...