Medieval & Renaissance Drama in England

Medieval & Renaissance Drama in England is a magazine focusing on Arts

Articles from Vol. 22, Annual

"A Fine and Private Place": Chapman's Theatrical Widow
I. MARVELL underestimates the amorous imagination when he says that "the grave's a fine and private place, / But none ... do there embrace." In Bartholomew Fair Quarlous argues almost the opposite, that suitors must "visit [a widow] as thou wouldst...
Alice Layston and the Cross Keys
Until very recently, the four London inns that served as playhouses in the last quarter of the sixteenth century--the Bell Savage on Ludgate Hill, the Bull in Bishopsgate Street, and the Bell and the Cross Keys in Gracechurch Street--have been sadly...
Dux Moraud: Criminality and Salvation in an East Anglian Play
ONE of the most intriguing among the handful of extant fragments of medieval British drama included in Norman Davis's Early English Text Society edition of Non-Cycle Plays and Fragments is Dux Moraud, a 265-line item contained in Bodleian Library MS....
My Magic Can Lick Your Magic
THIS is an inquiry into a certain kind of episode found in earlier literature that I call the "magic contest" because it centers on a confrontation between two people (or sometimes between one person and a group) in which each side makes use of or...
Orange-Women, Female Spectators, and Roaring Girls: Women and Theater in Early Modern England
AT the beginning of Ben Jonson's Epicene (1609) Morose's friends discuss how sensitive he is to noise, in particular, the cries of "fishwives and orange-women." (1) In a play that satirizes women, and particularly vocal ones, the inclusion of these...
Playing in the Provinces: Front or Back Door?
BECAUSE it cast the mold for centuries of perceptions about provincial playing, an excerpt from the June 29, 1572, "Acte for the punishement of Vacabondes and for Releif of the Poore & Impotent" is worth repeating, yet again, as a headpiece to...
Puritanism and the Closing of the Theaters in 1642
UNTIL comparatively recently, the stock assumption of literary historians was that in the later sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries there was an intense mutual antipathy and hostility between Puritanism and the stage. Puritans regarded theaters...
"That Which Marreth All": Constancy and Gender in the Virtuous Octavia
In his study of the influence of French Senecanism on the drama of the Pembroke circle, A. M. Witherspoon effectively dismisses Samuel Brandon's 1598 closet drama, The Virtuous Octavia. Calling it "a servile imitation of [Samuel Daniel's] Cleopatra"...
The Merry Tanner, the Mayor's Feast, and the King's Mistress: Thomas Heywood's 1 Edward IV and the Ballad Tradition
Although Thomas Heywood's The First and Second Parts of King Edward the Fourth (1599) are nominally chronicle history plays, Heywood often seems to stretch the definition of history to the breaking point. The play's title page, which promises to present...
The Third Citizen: Shakespeare's Theater and the Early Modern House of Commons
The Third Citizen: Shakespeare's Theater and the Early Modern House of Commons, by Oliver Arnold. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2007. Pp. xii + 308 pp. Cloth $55.00. Reviewer: CHRIS FITTER Like obsessive paparazzi squinting down...
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