Medieval & Renaissance Drama in England

Medieval & Renaissance Drama in England is a magazine focusing on Arts

Articles from Vol. 23, Annual

Declamation and Character in the Fletcher-Massinger Plays
GIVEN the capacity of scholars of English Renaissance drama to disagree over just about anything, the strength of their consensus with regard to one particular issue is virtually astonishing: the superficiality of character within the plays, especially...
"Deep Prescience": Succession and the Politics of Prophecy in Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay
In a well-known episode from the Faerie Queene (1590), the seer Merlin delivers a political prophecy to Britomart which predicts the ascension of a "royall virgin" to the throne of England. It is an instance of what Marjorie Garber calls "hindsight...
Parallels and Poetry: Shakespeare, Kyd, and Arden of Faversham
IN Attributing Authorship: An Introduction, Harold Love asserts that "literary quality is a genuine attribute of writing and one that can be recognised. As such it will be one of the criteria drawn on in conferring or denying attribution." (1) This...
Reading Orlando Historically: Vagrancy, Forest, and Vestry Values in Shakespeare's as You like It
IN pursuing the original meaning(s) of As You Like It--recuperating the drama as they liked it--we should seek, by conventional imperative, the historicities of the local level. Ros. Then shall we be news-crammed. Celia. All the better; we shall be...
Rereading the Side Panels in the View of London from the North
Until Herbert Berry's 2000 essay in Shakespeare Survey 53, (1) analyses of The View of the Cittye of London from the North towards the Sowth, which pictures a Shoreditch playhouse, accepted the Utrecht impression as unique. But in 1998, Ralph Hyde,...
The "To Be, or Not to Be" Speech: Evidence, Conventional Wisdom, and the Editing of Hamlet
SUBSTANTIAL, conspicuous, and varied pieces of evidence demonstrate that Shakespeare designed the "To be, or not to be" speech to be perceived by experienced playgoers of his time as a feigned soliloquy. Plentiful evidence within the play implies that...
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