The Virginia Quarterly Review

The Virginia Quarterly Review is a magazine focusing on current and historical literary subjects. Since it was founded in 1925, it is produced quarterly. The magazine is published by the Virginia Quarterly Review.Subjects for The Virginia Quarterly Review include literature and literary reviews. The editor is Ted Genoways. Contributing editors are Molly Minturn and Kevin Morrissey

Articles from Vol. 83, No. 2, Spring

Agamemnon's Daughter: A Novella and Stories
FICTION Agamemnon's Daughter: A Novella and Stories, by Ismail Kadare, translated by David Bellos. Arcade Publishing, November 2006. $14Kadare, winner of the Man Booker Prize in 2005, here explores the astonishingly cruel and inhuman permutations of...
Airport Economy Inn
No one speaking, nothing movingexcept for the way the snow keeps falling,its falling a kind of talking in the darkwhile all across the valley we keep on sleepingin the separate conditions of our dreaming.His face all overgrown with concernthe newsman's...
A Trick of Sunlight
A Trick of Sunlight, by Dick Davis. Swallow Press, June 2006. $14.95 paperDavis's poems exemplify Auden's definition of the art as "the clear expression of mixed feelings." With a sly, self-deprecating wit, a wisdom that spurns bombast, they are charming,...
Barbarians at the Wall
Barbarians at the WallThe Great Wall: China Against the World, 1000 BC-AD 2000, by Julia Lovell. Grove, March 2006. $25 cloth, $15 paperThe West Bank Wall: Unmaking Palestine, by Ray Dolphin. Pluto Press, March 2006. $22.95 paperFugitive Landscapes:...
Borders and Barriers
Two men in friendship are stronger than walls of stone.-ancient Mongolian sayingWhat was I supposed to do? More than 30,000 people, the best and most capable of the country, left the GDR in July. It is quite easy to calculate the moment of breakdown...
Border Town
Since the moment a foreign foot first touched American soil, there has been a constant inward flow of immigrants; each for their own reason but most to escape hardships and oppressions and to search for a better way of life. All have made their indelible...
Dark Horses: Poets on Overlooked Poems
POETRY Dark Horses: Poets on Overlooked Poems, edited by Joy Katz and Kevin Prufer. Illinois, December 2006. $19.95 paperThe idea behind Dark Horses started as a conversation among five poets about "wonderful, obscure poems we'd come across over the...
Hart Crane: Complete Poems and Selected Letters
Hart Crane: Complete Poems and Selected Letters, edited by Langdon Hammer. Library of America, September 2006. $40Despite Crane's tortured personal life, the intellectual optimism that drove his masterpieces, White Buildings and The Bridge (along with...
Intercourse
John Wilkes Booth, 24, actorCatherine Winslow, 26, actressin his rooms at the National hotel, Washington DC, after the opening of his production of Richard III, which was attended by President and Mrs. Abraham Lincoln, April 11, 1863John Wilkesyou dare...
Life on the Line: The Arizona-Mexico Border
Eduardo saw Jesus coming with His holy light. It was winter, and for days, lost in a strange land, Eduardo had been wandering through mountains with nothing to eat and nothing to drink except what he could scoop from puddles of melted snow. He barely...
Mexico, America, and the Continental Divide
I'm sitting at the bar in a Depression-era saloon on a slightly seedy commercial strip in Pomona, California. The town is bathed in the harsh glare of an autumn sun, but in here it's dim and cool, the light muted by heavy curtains and brick walls and...
Surprised in Translation
LITERARY STUDIES Surprised in Translation, by Mary Ann Caws. Chicago, September 2006. $25Caws, Distinguished Professor of English, French, and Comparative Literature at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, takes a moment to look back...
"That Grotesque and Laughable Word"
Rethinking Patriotism in Time of WarOn April 14, 1887, Walt Whitman delivered a lecture he had given several times before, describing a moment that his audience knew well. Whitman reserved his talk, "Death of Abraham Lincoln," for the assassination's...
The Accidental Plagiarist: Thoughts on the Anxiety of Influence, the Influence of Anxiety, and the Trouble with Originality
I. We Few, We Hapless FewMany a man fails as an original thinker simply because his memory is too good.-Friedrich Nietzsche, Human, All Too HumanThere comes a point in many a person's life when things that Nietzsche said begin to make good sense.This...
The Crossing
It's one of my earliest memories: riding my father's shoulders, as he waded across the Rio Grande. We were headed south toward Boquillas del Carmen, a tiny Mexican village that sits just across the border from Big Bend National Park. We did what all...
The Essential Wayne Booth
The Essential Wayne Booth, edited by Walter Jost. Chicago, July 2006. $35A leading literary critic of the twentieth century, Wayne C. Booth meticulously explored rhetoric and its control over our reading (and daily) experience. This collection of previously...
The Gross-Out Factor
In the garden that is the body, there is little as fertile as granulation tissue. It is a fleshy version of the richest topsoil, a vermilion carpeting that appears within a few days of injury and gives rise to new blood vessels and skin. Wounds that...
The Hotel Malogo
The sun was setting when I got off the bus and entered the empty hotel bar. Most of the space in the dim rectangular room was taken up by iron chairs arranged round iron tables, the white paint peeling off to reveal the rust, brown and streaky, underneath....
The Image as History
Clint Eastwood's Unmaking of an American MythHistory is always the interpretation of the present.-George Herbert MeadIn a speech delivered on August 30, 2005,the eve of the sixtieth anniversary of the American victory over Japan, President Bush declared,...
The Robert Bellah Reader
The Robert Bellah Reader, edited by Robert N. Bellah and Steven M. Tipton. Duke, October 2006. $27.95 paperCalling Robert Bellah a sociologist is like calling Louis Armstrong a trumpet player. The Bellah Reader demonstrates what a serious scholar can...
The Second Sense
Five senses: hearing, sight, smell, touch, taste.-American Heritage DictionaryHe has to make a living any way he can.He was a young D.Phil, from Budapest then-when they emigrated, for reasons nobody here is interested in, there have been so many waves...
The Walt Whitman Controversy
A Lost DocumentThe publication of significant previously unpublished work by one of America's best-known authors is always a major literary event, but when it is an unpublished piece by Mark Twain about another of America's legendary writers, Walt Whitman,...
Waiting for the Worst
Baluchistan, 2006On a typically hot morning last October, about a dozen people squeezed into Majid Sohrabi's office, sitting on the black, pleather chairs pushed up against the walls. A ceiling fan whirled and wobbled overhead on its axis. Sohrabi, the...
Walking Backward in the Dark
So, the jury says, once upon a time you fed the poor.You couldn't see the ground for the wreckage.If the women had dysentery behind their shedsthe earth turned green and red and yellowand you couldn't tell what was food and whatwas shit and all your...
Wretch like Me
In the hospitality of war we left them their dead to remember us by.-ArchilochusThe soldier kneeling in the wet gully has ceased his rocking and sobbing, though the claw-pronged limb reaching over him keeps trembling in the breeze, its shadow shaking,...