The Virginia Quarterly Review

The Virginia Quarterly Review is a magazine focusing on current and historical literary subjects. Since it was founded in 1925, it is produced quarterly. The magazine is published by the Virginia Quarterly Review.Subjects for The Virginia Quarterly Review include literature and literary reviews. The editor is Ted Genoways. Contributing editors are Molly Minturn and Kevin Morrissey

Articles from Vol. 73, No. 3, Summer

All about Arnold
The Letters of Matthew Arnold, Volume 1, 1829-1859. Edited by Cecil Y. Lang. The University Press of Virginia. $60.00. In Britain, the Arnolds, father and son, are still names to conjure with, their ideas still thought to be relevant. Just last fall,...
Breaking Fast to High Scores
Passing Of: By Tom LeClair. Permanent Press. $22.00. Among the criteria by which baseball was judged "America's pastime" for the better part of a century were 1) the fact that almost every American boy played it; 2) that more mature Americans followed...
Der Rechte Weg
I lived in five houses in three cities by the time I was 12. Nevertheless, when I think of my childhood I think of Topeka and the two-story, white clapboard house with its full front porch on Lindenwood. We moved to 615 Lindenwood before I began kindergarten;...
France's Two Cities
Pleasure boats ride the Yonne as it flows through Auxerre, at ease on both sides of the river. The right size for a city, it has wealth but not too much, enough to feed the body, including the part that can't live by bread alone. The train from Paris...
From Cubism to Classicism
A Life of Picasso. Volume II: 1907-1917. By John Richardson. Random House. $55.00. This handsomely designed and bountifully illustrated volume opens when Picasso is 26 and devotes 500 pages to ten years-only one-ninth of his long life. But during this...
Japanese Fan
Seeing without seeing: surely he's been here, in plain sight, all along? Nevertheless, these months and months have gone by without his presence registering. Understandable, maybe: it isn't so strange for a woman to overlook a man whose head she can...
Jeffersonian Controversy and Character
Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings: An American Controversy. By Annette Gordon-Reed. University Press of Virginia. $29.95. American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson. By Joseph J. Ellis. Knopf. $26.00. Finding someone who doesn't know that Thomas...
Joan of Dreams
The windrower lurched left, and Joan raised the cutting bar to slide over what she knew was the unseen mound of a gopher hole under the dry alfalfa. The earth in the dark shadow was damp still from rain days before, and the windrower veered sharply until...
Lincoln, Clinton, and Vaulting Ambition
I have no spur To prick the sides of my intent but only Vaulting ambition which o'erleaps itself and falls on the other. -Macbeth. I.vii Ambition is a subject more easily described than discussed by political scientists and historians. Scholars of American...
Of a Troubled World, Diplomacy, and a Diplomat/statesman
The Last American Aristocrat: The Biography of Ambassador David K E. Bruce. By Nelson D. Lankford. Little, Brown. $27.95. Randall Jarrell once expressed the feeling that the poet has a curious relationship with the public. It doesn't know he is there....
Prince Albert and King Lothar
In a long Foreign Service career I had some difficult postsPanama when anti-U.S. feelings were running high; Moscow in the 1960's; Mogadishu, as Somalia neared collapse. But none of these was as tough as my months as an Army recruit in Missouri. God...
Reading Faces/Reading Culture, or How I Brooded about Three Writerly Photographs
That we are awash in visual images hardly constitutes cultural news. Ours has been a sight-and-sound society for much longer than print-heads like myself care to admit. It's not just that television and tabloids, film, computer graphics, and virtual...
Sugar House
The Sugar House used to be a real tavern over on old Route Nine-one of them tiny places with four stools and a juke box. It's got a big oak rocking chair now for me, but it used to be a place to buy beer and hang out. You wouldn't want your girls over...
The Bridegroom
The apple trees were blighted. I knew it when I first saw them, even though Otto denied it. An excellent orchard, he had said in his letters, a tidy farmhouse. You will be well taken care of, the wife of a landowner. But the apples were small and misshapen...
The Fable of Failure in Modern Art
We should not forget that 99 percent of all art-making attempts are failures." Thus declares Phillip Lopate the essayist in his recent book, Portrait of My Body. Although the phrase "art-making attempts" offends one's sense of prose style, Lopate's statement...
The Green Room
"Here's a marvellous convenient place for our rehearsal." Having described personal forays through Sicily (autumn 1994) and Scotland (spring 1996), seasoned traveler RUSSELL FRASER now turns his discerning eye to the ancient country of France in his...
The Liberals' Southern Strategy
Days of Hope: Race and Democracy in the New Deal Era. By Patricia Sullivan. University of North Carolina Press. $39.95 cloth, $17.95 paperback. When, in a pop paean to "Little Sister" (1961), Elvis Presley snarls that "she's mean and she's evil/Like...
The Stone Well
Six feet from the rim the old vertigo begins. In the tall grass flattened and gone to seed. In the white glare of the October sun. In the murmur of insects, in the smell of stone. What's hunger but a smell of stone. Come here! Closer. This is the well...
Up for Grabs
A child of immigrants, I like to think that the muddled English of my parents' generation was an exercise in patriotism, its imprecision testimony to democracy's premise that one man's opinion is as good as another's. Take prepositions, for example....