The Virginia Quarterly Review

The Virginia Quarterly Review is a magazine focusing on current and historical literary subjects. Since it was founded in 1925, it is produced quarterly. The magazine is published by the Virginia Quarterly Review.Subjects for The Virginia Quarterly Review include literature and literary reviews. The editor is Ted Genoways. Contributing editors are Molly Minturn and Kevin Morrissey

Articles from Vol. 78, No. 4, Autumn

'A Bestiary of Sin'
In Defense of Sin. Edited by John Portmann. Palgrave Press. $23.95 Handbooks aiming to lead us to the good life are nothing new. One of the best known such books is surely the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius, but the tradition would also include the sententia...
A Catastrophic Battlefield
Hell in Hurtgen Forest. By Robert Rush. University Press of Kansas. $34.95. The Bloody Forest. By Gerald Astor. Presidio. $29.95 The flood of World War II memorabilia shows no signs of ebbing. The vast outpouring of books, memoirs, letters, diaries,...
A Mediterranean Goddess on the James
I sometimes think it may be easier for a Westerner to write about Chinese than for a Northerner to write about Virginians. My wife of 45 years, and the source of this story and its mysteries, is Virginia born and bred. I myself have lived in the Commonwealth...
Bear Dreams
BEAR DREAMS What had seemed to him in June just a few five-petaled pink wild roses was in fact a weeks long, slow-moving onslaught of flowers. He sees this now, in September, having come down from the house to the deep undergrowth outside the fence,...
Blue Plate
After the porno theater became a revival house, the neighborhood began to change. The Blue Plate, a designer diner, opened, all aluminum and curves. Inside, the menu featured revived comfort foodsmeat loaf, mashed potatoes, a glass case full of pies....
Children of the Middle Ages
Medieval Children. By Nicholas Orme. Yale University Press. $39.95. In the course of the singular True Account of the Island of England, written toward the end of the 15th century by an Italian visitor, we are told that: "The want of affection in the...
Confronting the American Dilemma
CONFRONTING THE AMERICAN DILEMMA By HUGH MURRAY Better Day Coming: Blacks and Equaliy, 1890-2000. By Adam Fairclough. Viking. $26.95. Adam Fairclough, English author of several outstanding works on American civil rights history, has written an "interpretation"...
Daughters of a People and Culture
The Daughters Return: African-American and Caribbean Women's Fictions of History. By Caroline Rody. Oxford. $49.95 Caroline Rody's revisionary literary criticism offers new and persuasive ways to understand the "renaissance" of AfricanAmerican women...
Dead Dog Lying
Carlee thinks she smells something dead in her oven, but she knows this is impossible because she keeps her kitchen as clean as her life. A former Ponchatoula High School Strawberry Queen, Carlee Tantillo is married to an electrical engineer and has...
Drawbridges on the Delaware
Ask Donna Norcross about the time the guy tried to jump off the Tacony-Palmyra Bridge and she'll tell you something like this: One day a car stopped in the middle of the bridge's draw span and a man leaped out, ran to the railing, and climbed over, threatening...
Effie in Venice and the Roman Spring of Margaret Fuller
One thing leads to another. The year 2000 marked the 100th year of the death of eminent Victorian art critic, writer, reformer John Ruskin. Coincident with celebratory exhibits both in England and in this country, there appeared a de-mythologizing play...
Father's Day
Malcolm Turner, 68, of 1139 Pine Avenue in Oak Grove, owner of Turner's Trophy World, 18 N. Clark Avenue, Chicago, died yesterday in his home. Mr. Turner was an elder of the First Presbyterian Church of Oak Grove. Surviving are his widow, Kathleen, two...
Final Thought
FINAL THOUGHT What I have written thus far is but a treatise On the owl and the moon, as if the given Were world enough, as if one thousand and one Views of the moon-each phase marked, inscrutableIllumined the hairline crack in the plaster, The door...
Flying Horses on the Silk Road
The warriors of Xi'an stood in darkness for 2,000 years, watching over their dead emperor. He was Qin, pronounced Chin, whose successors built the Great Wall and gave a name to China. The warriors are ranked in battalions, archers, cavalry with their...
Lee's Army Revisited
The Smoothbore Volley That Doomed the Confederacy: The Death of Stonewall Jackson and Other Chapters On the Army of Northern Virginia. By Robert K. Krick. Louisiana State. $34.95. Nineteen men in two distinct groups rode forward from the coalescing Confederate...
My Mother's Eye
POETRY She kept it in its plastic case beside her carousel of pills, the single contact she wore in place of the left lens she lost to a blown cataract. "I have to put my eye in," she'd say, unscrewing the cap, then would fish with her fingertip to find...
Once More: The Actual and the Apocryphal
Faulkner's County: The Historical Roots of Yoknapatawpha. By Don H. Doyle. University of North Carolina Press. $49.45 cloth, $24.95 paper. Some of William Faulkner's remarks about his work are now almost as famous as some phrases in the work itself....
Selected Poems
Selected Poems, by Victor Hugo, translated by Brooks Haxton. Brooks Haxton's method of translation in this selection of Hugo's poems suffers from a kind of schizophrenia. Haxton begins his note on the translation by telling us "I have begun by trying...
Skinning
SKINNING How many times did I hold them up for him and watch how easily something that had lived comes apart? In each hand I clutched an unlucky foot and splayed them, belly-side to him, and he'd pinch the fur at the crotch and with the knifepoint separate...
The CIA's Secret War in Tibet
The CIA'S Secret War in Tibet, by Kenneth Conboy and James Morrison. This is a fascinating book which serves as a wonderful corrective to those who still tend to romanticize all things Tibetan (and I count myself among their number). It also provides...
The Criterion: Cultural Politics and Periodical Networks in Inter-War Britain
The Criterion: Cultural Politics and Periodical Networks in Inter-War Britain, by Jason Harding. This study "provide[s] a thickly textured account of the melieu of British inter-war journalism necessary for measured assessment of the history and significance...
The Green Room
"Here's a marvellous convenient place for our rehearsal." Ever since the days of Atlanta editor, Henry Grady, in the late 19th century, a "New South" has been proclaimed just about every time a Southern newspaper reporter is promoted to columnist. But...
The South in a Global World
VQR The Virginia Quarterly Review A National Journal of Literature and Discussion James McBride Dabbs wrote, "Of all the Americans, the Southerner is the most at home in the world. Or at least in the South, which, because of its very at-homeness, he...
The Weather in Berlin
The Weather in Berlin, by Ward Just. First reviews of Just's 13th novel have rightly underscored its atmospheric richness, its powerful evocation of restless Americans abroad, and its engaging plot, whose complexity can only be suggested here. Dixon...
The World of Milton Scholarship
How Milton Works. By Stanley Fish. Harvard University Press. $35. The Life of John Milton. By Barbara K. Lewalski. Blackwell. $39.95 Forty years ago a volume of essays on Milton's poetry by a number of well-known academic critics bore the title The Living...
Uncle Jeff Davis
I drove around the courthouse square four times. The Confederate monument had been moved to the cemetery decades ago. I stopped and knocked on the door of the police station, a small corrugated yellow building also housing the fire department. A large...
Why I Don't Read Books Much Anymore
For several years now I've been reading fewer books, from start to finish, that is. Not that my reading has diminished. If anything, I'm reading more now, more words certainly, every day, every week, daily and Sunday newspapers, weeklies, fortnightlies,...